FINALLY THE TRUTH: Three State Of Michigan Workers Charged In Flint Water Crisis

From the beginning, the target of blame for the Flint water crisis has been Michigan Governor Snyder but the Department of Environmental Quality employees have been numero uno on our list of people to blame. This crisis has been politicized like crazy by politicians like Hillary Clinton, but anyone who focused and read up on the details would know the DEQ is at fault BIGTIME! The Democrats will continue to spin this claiming these three employees are “scapegoats” but the trial will show otherwise…

Two state regulators and a Flint employee were charged Wednesday with evidence tampering and other felonies and misdemeanors, for the first time raising the lead-tainted water crisis in the Michigan city to a criminal case.

Months after officials conceded that a series of bad decisions had caused a disaster, charges were filed against a pair of state Department of Environmental Quality employees and a local water treatment supervisor and stem from an investigation by the Michigan attorney general’s office.

For nearly 18 months, the financially troubled city of Flint, where the majority of residents are black, used the Flint River for tap water as a way to save money — a decision made by a state-appointed emergency manager — while a new pipeline was under construction. But the water wasn’t treated to control corrosion. The result: Lead was released from aging pipes and fixtures as water flowed throughout the city of 100,000 residents.

Flint played a key role in the Democrats’ presidential nomination race in March, when Michigan held its primary, with Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders debating in Flint and taking turns lambasting the Snyder administration.

Michael Prysby, a DEQ district engineer, and Stephen Busch, who is a supervisor with the DEQ’s Office of Drinking Water, were both charged with misconduct in office, conspiracy to tamper with evidence, tampering with evidence and misdemeanor violations of water law.

They’re both accused of failing to order chemicals to control corrosion. Michigan environmental regulators have acknowledged misreading federal regulations and wrongly telling the city that the chemicals were not needed.

Flint utilities administrator Michael Glasgow also was charged Wednesday with tampering with evidence for changing lead water-testing results and willful neglect of duty as a public servant.

READ MORE: TOWNHALL


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