Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton answers a question at the 2014 National Council for Behavioral Health Conference at Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, Md., Tuesday, May 6, 2014. Clinton spoke about mental health, political, and social issues during her talk. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

The Friday document dump today included 300 of the thousands of yet to be released Clinton e-mails. How convenient to release these on a holiday weekend. We’re all being scammed in all this because these are the e-mails hand picked by Hillaries minions. We won’t get to the truth because it was destroyed. This entire thing is smelling to high heaven…

The State Department released its first round of emails from Hillary Clinton’s time as Secretary of State on Friday, offering a new look at her handling of the attacks on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi.

The roughly 300 emails, about 850 pages, are part of the 30,000 that she turned over to State from her private email server, which she used almost exclusively to conduct both private and public business during her time at State. They reveal a range of correspondence from Clinton, everything from policy briefs to scheduling requests to friendly exchanges with staff.

White House press secretary Josh Earnest says the new emails “do not change in any way anyone’s understanding” of what happened in Benghazi, and the State Department reiterated the same in a tweet.

“The emails we release today do not change the essential facts or our understanding of the events before, during, or after the attacks,” the department tweeted.

Clinton herself commented on the release at a campaign stop in New Hampshire on Friday, telling reporters she was happy they were out but was waiting for more.

“It’s beginning. I just would like to see it expedited, so we could get more of them out more quickly,” she said.

Below, a collection of some of the most newsworthy tidbits from the emails:

A supportive boss
In one email, sent four days before Christmas in 2012, Clinton sent a note to her entire State Department staff, acknowledging a “challenging week.” She had fainted about a week prior and suffered a concussion, which prevented her from testifying before House and Senate committees on the attacks.

“We need to learn from the tragedy in Benghazi and make every possible improvement — and we will,” she wrote in the five-paragraph note.

One day earlier, Clinton wrote in an email to two top aides headed to the Hill on her behalf: “I’ll be nursing my cracked head and cheering you on as you ‘remain calm and carry on!'”

One of those aides, Tom Nides, hints that he’s not entirely excited about the grilling.

Clinton replies: “Well, what doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger (as I have rationalized for years), so just survive and you’ll have triumphed!”

In most emails, she’s referred to simply as “H.”

Stress over Benghazi scrutiny
One email hints at the scrutiny the State Department was facing over Clinton’s response to the Benghazi attacks. In their remarks the day after the attack, both Clinton and President Barack Obama made reference to an anti-Muslim video that some intelligence initially suggested prompted the attacks, a claim that was later found to be mistaken.

On Sept. 24, 2012, Jake Sullivan, Clinton’s deputy chief of staff at State, forwards her a 24-page document compiling all of the statements she had made after the attacks, and reassures her that she was careful in her wording.

“You never said spontaneous or characterized the motives. In fact you were careful in your first statement to say we were assessing motive and method,” he says.

Sullivan also writes: “The way you treated the video in the Libya context was to say that some sought to *justify* the attack on that basis.”

Advice on foreign affairs
Clinton received advice on foreign affairs from a range of former advisers from outside of the department, including Sidney Blumenthal, the former Clinton White House aide who’s drawn scrutiny for issuing over two dozen memos to Clinton on Libya while also advising businesses looking to break into post-Gaddafi Libya.

The emails reveal that Clinton often read, commented on and forwarded Blumenthal’s memos — which laid out information obtained from his own sources on the situation in Libya — to Sullivan. Blumenthal will comply with a subpoena issued by the House Select Committee on Benghazi this week after his role in advising Clinton emerged.

In a September 2012 email, Burns Strider, a senior adviser and director of Faith and Values Outreach on Clinton’s 2008 campaign, forwards her a post from CNN’s Belief blog by Stephen Prothero titled “My Take: A deadly link between Islamic and anti-Islamic terrorists.” She typically forwards these to State Department aides.

Libya security concerns
In the years leading up to the attack covered by the emails, there were a number of hints at the decaying security situation in Libya — key sticking point for Republican critics of Clinton’s performance at State. Many believe she ignored warnings that the security there was declining and showed poor judgment in failing to beef up protection for U.S. officials there.

In June of 2011, Sullivan emailed Hillary warning of a “credible threat against the hotel that our team is using,” and told her security officials would be moving personnel to other locations.

She received an update in 2011 from Stevens on how fragile the security forces were in the country.

“The police chief is a university professor who took on these police duties after the revolution. According to the police chief, there are only 3,000 police in the Benghazi area, down from 6,000 prior to the revolution. Many police simply did not return to their jobs after the revolution, as they feared retaliation,”

Another email, sent in February of 2012 by then Ambassador to Libya Gene Cretz, warned of “concern here that continuing rivalries among the militias remains dangerous from the perspective of the havoc they can wreak with their firepower and their continued control of select turf.”

Congratulations and condolences on Benghazi
In the days following the attacks, Clinton received a stream of condolences and congratulations from diplomats, lawmakers and world leaders on her handling of the situation.

On Sept. 13, Clinton is forwarded an email from U.S. Ambassador to Israel Dan Shapiro, who says that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called him to offer “profound condolences” about the Benghazi attack. “He said Israelis know too well how difficult these moments are, and he wanted us all to know that Israelis stand shoulder-to-shoulder with us at such a difficult time,” Shapiro writes.

Christian Brose, Sen. John McCain’s national security adviser, emailed Sullivan on Sept. 12, 2012, the day Clinton gave a speech honoring those who died in the attacks, sending his boss’s compliments. “What a wonderful, strong and moving statement by your boss. Please tell her how much Sen. McCain appreciated it. Me too,” he wrote.

Former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates also sent his condolences.

Intelligence holes?
One October 2012 email underscores the limits of U.S. intelligence. Clinton emailed senior aide Cheryl Mills asking about an NPR report on the attacks.

“I just heard an NPR report about the CIA station chief in Tripoli sending a cable on 9/12 saying there was no demo etc.,” she wrote. “Do you know about this?”

Thoughts on the media
A transcript of an interview with Wall Street Journal Reporter Monica Langley was circulated among a few top aides with commentary from Philippe Reines, a longtime spokesman for Clinton.

He declared the October 10, 2012, conversation as an “awesome interview.” But he went on to say that Langley violated Clinton’s personal space, by moving her chair knee-to-knee with the secretary, comparing it to “the dental hygienist rolling around the floor to get the best access to your mouth depending on which tooth she was trying to get access to.”

“I’ve never seen a westerner invade her space like that,” Reines wrote. But he went on to describe the interview as “wonderful. One of the best interviews I’ve ever witnesses. Wish it were on live TV.”

Read more: cnn

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