HERE’S HOW THE CLINTONS’ Free Private Jet Scam Works: “It’s highly illegal”

The Clintons have always behaved like the rules and laws don’t apply to them. Since the day they left the White House, they’ve been doing whatever it takes to profit off of their position in politics. The problem is that it’s illegal to do some of the things they were doing but they’ve been getting away with it for decades:

“It’s highly illegal and it’s likely that the owners of these aircraft took tax deductions as a gift to the Clinton Foundation,” Charles Ortel, a Wall Street analyst and critic of the Clinton Foundation


Ira Magaziner, the CEO of the Clinton Health Access Initiative, asked former President Bill Clinton to thank Morocco’s King Mohammed VI for “offering his plane to the conference in Ethiopia.”

“CHAI would like to request that President Clinton call Sheik Mohammed to thank him for offering his plane to the conference in Ethiopia,” Magaziner gushed in a November 22, 2011 email released by WikiLeaks.

Clinton frequently has expected free, luxurious private jet travel during his post-presidential life. Clinton, his wife and daughter have artfully secured free air travel and luxurious accommodations since they left the White House. It’s an effective way to accept gifts of great value without declaring them for the Clinton Foundation.

“It’s highly illegal and it’s likely that the owners of these aircraft took tax deductions as a gift to the Clinton Foundation,” Charles Ortel, a Wall Street analyst and critic of the Clinton Foundation.

In the Moroccan case, Clinton was able to fly for free, jetting 3,367 miles from Rabat, Morocco, to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia on the King’s specially equipped 747-400 jumbo jet.

Not including the flight, King Mohammed has donated at least $28 million to the Clinton Foundation. 

Clinton was traveling to attend a conference organized by Sheikh Mohammed Hussein Al-Amoudi, an Ethiopian-Saudi billionaire who is the second wealthiest man in Saudi Arabia. The sheikh has donated up to $10 million to the Clinton Foundation.
But neither the Clinton Foundation nor CHAI have listed any “non-cash contributions” — such as free jumbo jet travel — on their 2011 tax return for the free use of the aircraft.

Via: Daily Caller

 

 

 

 


Join The Conversation: Leave a Comment