IRANIAN MILLIONAIRE PRINCE Charged With Food Stamp Fraud in Ohio…Still Bought Starbucks, Tanning, Cable TV,

If you’ve been following us at all you know that many, many stories of food stamp fraud involve Muslim immigrants. Here’s yet another Muslim “working the system” to get freebies that are supposed to be for those in need. 

The wealthy son of an Iranian prince is under investigation for food-stamp fraud in Ohio, authorities say.

But Ali Pascal Mahvi, a 65-year-old businessman who lives between St. Lucia and Geauga County, claims he’s innocent.
On Friday morning, police raided Mahvi’s six-acre residence, hauling away computers and boxes of documents from his $800,000 mansion in Russell Township. Local TV footage zoomed in on his in-ground swimming pool, horse stable, and garage with luxury cars, including a BMW and Lexus convertible.

“It’s outrageous to see a situation where somebody is living in a house almost worth a million dollars, a horse barn, driving luxury cars, have millions of dollars in overseas bank accounts and here they are accepting this type of assistance,” Geauga County prosecutor James R. Flaiz told WKYC, which first revealed the raid.
“Certainly, they were very good at manipulating the system,” Flaiz added.
Prosecutors claim Mahvi is a millionaire who gamed the system for two years to snag $300 a month in food stamps—or $8,358 to date, authorities say—as well as Medicaid for his wife and three adult children.
They say the American descendent to royalty has a Swiss bank account worth $4 million—an allegation Mahvi steadfastly denies.
Cops are probing Mahvi’s bank accounts in an attempt to prove his cries of poverty were all a ploy. Investigators say the family has at least 14 bank accounts with a combined value of more than $4.2 million, WKYC reported.
As the family got food stamps from March 2014 to February 2016, they were also spending on $200 meals at local restaurants and $350 for cable TV, along with transactions at Starbucks and tanning salons, investigators say.

Read more: DB


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