MAJOR OUTDOOR CLOTHING COMPANY With Ties To Human Trafficking Wages War On President Trump Over Outrageous Obama Land Grab

President Trump supporters need to start letting leftist CEO’s who use company profits to take down our sitting President that we’re not going to sit by idly and let it happen. Americans need to remind these arrogant liberals that #Resistance is a two-way street. There’s no better way to #resist than with your wallet. #BoycottPatagonia…

The CEO of outdoor clothing giant Patagonia is burnishing her anti-Republican bona fides again, this time saying she intends to pledge her entire company to the “resistance” of President Donald Trump.

Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario recently attacked President Trump for his statements about rolling back President Obama’s unusually aggressive campaign of confiscating millions of acres of state lands and claiming them as “national monuments.”

Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario

“We have to fight like hell to keep every inch of public land,” Marcario said in a May article at Huffpost. “I don’t have a lot of faith in politics and politicians right now.”

In an effort to prevent citizens from retaking possession of their state lands, one of her immediate actions will be to sue the Trump administration for its efforts to scale back Obama’s unprecedented land grab.

“A president does not have the authority to rescind a national monument,” Marcario said in an April 26 statement after Trump announced his national monuments order. “An attempt to change the boundaries ignores the review process of cultural and historical characteristics and the public input.”

In particular, the Trump administration is preparing to revisit Obama’s order to create the Bears Ears National Monument. In April, Trump issued an executive order requiring the Department of the Interior to review Obama’s actions on national monuments. Ordering Interior Secretary Ray Zinke to review Obama’s policies in April, President Trump called Obama’s move an “egregious abuse of federal power.”

Many state governments fully agree with Trump’s assessment and were furious when Obama swooped in from Washington and stole away millions of acres of land from state control to create new national monuments and parks.

A poll of residents of Utah, for instance, showed that 60 percent opposed Obama’s land grab, while only 33 percent supported it.

This is far from the first time the sportswear company pledged its profits to political matters. Last year, the California-based company spent over $1 million for a get-out-the-vote campaign to defeat Donald Trump and Republicans. –Breitbart

Has Patagonia CEO really earned the right to be the so-called conscience of America? What about the discovery of human-trafficking and forced labor issues with mills that employed people who produce their line?

Patagonia is an accredited and founding member of the Fair Labor Association; its website is as much an educational tool about environmental and social responsibility—filled with information on issues such as preservation of land in Chile, labeling GMO products, and responsible sourcing—as it is an online store. In a note launching the company’s food division, Patagonia Provisions, company founder Yvon Chouinard restated the brand’s central ethos: “We aim to make the best product, cause no unnecessary harm, and perhaps most important, inspire solutions to the environmental crisis.”

And yet, despite these aspirations, four years ago internal audits turned up multiple instances of human trafficking, forced labor, and exploitation in Patagonia’s supply chain, according to Cara Chacon, the company’s director of social and environmental responsibility, and Thuy Nguyen, the manager of supply chain social responsibility and special programs.

The audits examined not Patagonia’s first-tier suppliers—the factories that cut, sew, and assemble Patagonia’s products—but the mills that take raw materials and produce the fabrics and other parts that later become jackets, backpacks, and so on for the world’s adventuring class. About one-quarter of those mills are based in Taiwan, and the majority were found to have instances of  trafficking and exploitation.The problems stemmed from how those mills found the people to work their factory lines. They didn’t hire workers themselves and instead turned to so-called labor brokers. These labor brokers charged migrants exorbitant, often illegally high fees in exchange for jobs. There were other red flags, too. Suppliers would open bank accounts into which the workers deposited their paychecks, so that fees for labor brokers could be automatically deducted. Workers’ movements were also restricted through the confiscation of passports. The recruitment and hiring process used by many labor brokers can create a cycle of fear and debt that leaves workers neither able to leave their jobs nor to make a decent living. – The Atlantic


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