MEDIA IGNORES Time That Bill Clinton FIRED His FBI Director On Day Before Vince Foster Was Found Dead

At the recommendation of both Attorney General Jeff Sessions and from Deputy Attorney General Rod J. Rosenstein, President Trump fired FBI Director James Comey yesterday. In his letter to Comet, President Trump stated that he believed FBI Director James Comey was “not able to effectively lead the Bureau.” Deputy Attorney General Rod J.Rosenstein blamed Comey’s handling of the Hillary Clinton email case. Attorney General Sessions agreed with Rosenstein saying “a fresh start is needed at the leadership of the FBI.”

In its 109-year history, only one F.B.I. director had been fired — until Tuesday, when President Trump fired James B. Comey. In July 1993, President Bill Clinton fired William S. Sessions, who had been nominated to the post by President Ronald Reagan in 1987. Mr. Clinton said his attorney general, Janet Reno, reviewed Mr. Sessions’s leadership and concluded “in no uncertain terms that he can no longer effectively lead the bureau.”

Former FBI Director William S. Sessions

Mr. Sessions had been cited for ethical lapses, including taking free trips on F.B.I. aircraft and using government money to build a $10,000 fence at his home. Mr. Sessions was asked to resign, and was fired when he refused to do so. “Despite the president’s severe tone, he seemed to regret having to force Mr. Sessions from his post,” The New York Times wrote about his dismissal:

WASHINGTON, July 19— President Clinton today dismissed William S. Sessions, the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, who had stubbornly rejected an Administration ultimatum to resign six months after a harsh internal ethics report on his conduct.

Mr. Clinton said he would announce his nominee to replace Mr. Sessions on Tuesday. He was expected to pick Judge Louis J. Freeh of Federal District Court in Manhattan; officials said Judge Freeh had impressed Mr. Clinton favorably on Friday at their first meeting.

Mr. Clinton, explaining his reasons for removing Mr. Sessions, effective immediately, said, “We cannot have a leadership vacuum at an agency as important to the United States as the F.B.I. It is time that this difficult chapter in the agency’s history is brought to a close.” Defiant to the End

But in a parting news conference at F.B.I. headquarters after Mr. Clinton’s announcement, a defiant Mr. Sessions — his right arm in a sling as a result of a weekend fall — railed at what he called the unfairness of his removal, which comes nearly six years into his 10-year term.

“Because of the scurrilous attacks on me and my wife of 42 years, it has been decided by others that I can no longer be as forceful as I need to be in leading the F.B.I. and carrying out my responsibilities to the bureau and the nation,” he said. “It is because I believe in the principle of an independent F.B.I. that I have refused to voluntarily resign.”

Mr. Clinton said that after reviewing Mr. Sessions’s performance, Attorney General Janet Reno had advised him that Mr. Sessions should go. “After a thorough review by the Attorney General of Mr. Sessions’s leadership of the F.B.I., she has reported to me in no uncertain terms that he can no longer effectively lead the bureau.”

Similarly, Mr. Trump fired Mr. Comey on the recommendation of his attorney general, Jeff Sessions. (No relation to William S. Sessions.) There are no United States statutes that discuss the president’s authority to remove the F.B.I. director. – NYT’s

Coincidence?

President Bill Clinton fired FBI Director William S. Sessions on July  19, 1993
Vince Foster was found dead on July 20, 1993

Was the suspicious death of Vince Foster and the firing of Republican FBI Director William S. Sessions firing a coincidence? Did President Clinton need an FBI Director who was willing to look the other way when it came to the alleged criminal activities of the Clintons?

 

From NewsMax December 4, 2003 via Free Republic.

“Vince Foster: What the Media Won’t Tell You”

“Major media outlets reported Wednesday on the Supreme Court hearing of California lawyer Allan Favish’s case that government photographs of Vincent Foster’s death scene be released for public viewing. The media report that no fewer than five investigations have found that Foster committed suicide because he was depressed. But despite 10 years of denial by the major media, the Foster case has not “closed” – as the Supreme Court hearing Wednesday demonstrated.
The case won’t close because of the failure of authorities to make full disclosure – and to conduct a full investigation into the case, including a complete autopsy.

Vince Foster was not only deputy White House counsel but also the personal attorney to Bill and Hillary Clinton.

On the night of Foster’s death, top Clinton aides made a frantic effort to enter and remove documents from his West Wing office. In the days that followed, federal investigators were stymied in their investigation of Foster’s office and strange death.

Since Foster’s July 1993 death, the facts of his death have been obfuscated by friends of Bill and Hillary in the major media, but here’s the undeniable truth:

There weren’t “five” investigations into Foster’s death, as the media report. The Park Police, best known for their meter and horse patrols around Washington, were put in charge of the initial death inquiry of the most important federal official to die suspiciously since President Kennedy. The Park Police, contradicting standard procedure, declared the death a suicide before launching their inquiry.

The FBI never officially investigated the case but simply signed off on the Park Police “probe.” The bureau had little choice. The day before Foster’s death, Bill Clinton hurriedly fired the director of the FBI, William Sessions. Sessions later charged that Clinton had “politicized” the bureau.

Later, Robert Fiske, selected by Clinton’s counsel Bernie Nussbaum and Janet Reno, quickly confirmed the Park Police probe as a suicide.

But when Ken Starr entered the investigation, he reopened the case. His chief prosecutor in the case, Miquel Rodriguez, later quit the Starr investigation, claiming that Starr’s staff was engaging in a cover-up of Foster’s death.

Rodriguez, a Harvard-educated federal prosecutor, argued that one of the Polaroid photos taken of Foster at the crime scene indicated an additional wound on Foster’s neck – never noted on the autopsy report. Favish’s suit before the Supreme Court is seeking to release this photo, among others.

No fewer than three of the paramedics on the scene indicated in reports or testimony that the crime scene was consistent with a murder scene, not a suicide.

A careful FBI microscopic investigation of Foster’s shoes found not a trace of soil or grass stains on them, though he supposedly walked several hundred yards through wooded Fort Marcy Park to where his body was found. [Years later, Starr’s investigation found plenty of soil and grass stains. Rodriguez charged that the shoes were tampered with to produce such “evidence.”]

According to the FBI report on Vince Foster’s death (below) blonde hairs were found on the body of Vince Foster, but were never investigated:

Foster was found with little blood around his body – and despite claims that he fired the gun into his mouth, practically no blood was found on the front of his shirt.

Foster was found with a 1913 revolver no one in his family could claim, with two serial numbers, made from the parts of three or more guns. None of Foster’s fingerprints were found on the gun.

For years, detail after detail emerged questioning the official ruling.

Significant questions were raised about the unusual gun – a .38 Colt revolver made from the parts of three guns with two serial numbers – found conveniently in Vince’s hand.

The Park Police said one of the serial numbers indicated the gun was vintage 1913 – and had no pedigree.

Foster family members insisted neither Foster nor his father ever owned the old revolver.

The NCIC keeps records of all law enforcment inquiries of serial numbers.

On March 23, 2001, the FBI responded to requests made by a man names Craig Brinkley:

Serial number 356555, one of the numbers on the gun, was never searched, not by the FBI, the Park Police or by that “investigation” by Ken Starr.

Serial number 355055 was found on the frame of the gun. Brinkley believes that was the gun’s real nnumber.

That number was indeed searched by the Park Police, on the evening of Foster’s death, more exactly at 22:45 EDT on July 20, 1993.

Interestingly, searches were conducted on the same serial number no fewer than three times earlier that year, before Foster’s death, on March 3, March 7 and April 29.

Was someone checking to see that this gun had a “clean” predigree and was untraceable?

The bullet from the gun that supposedly killed Foster was never found, despite intensive searches.

Despite claims to the contrary, no one who knew Foster, including Hillary, Web Hubbell and his own wife, saw signs of depression.

A so-called suicide note was found in an office briefcase that had been searched and found to be empty after Foster’s death. The note was torn into 27 pieces. Yet an FBI examination found no trace of Foster’s fingerprints on the note and a top Oxford handwriting expert found the note to be an “obvious” forgery.

Despite the enormity of the case, Foster’s autopsy lasted an astounding 45 minutes. The coroner in the case had previously been overruled in other cases he declared “suicides” that were later found to be murders.

All of the X-rays taken during the autopsy are missing.

Complete crime scene photos don’t exist. The Park Police said all the photos were “accidentally” overexposed. A series of close-up Polaroids, which Favish is suing for, remain. This is just a brief summary of the dozens of inconsistencies in the case. Two New York homicide investigators who looked into the case concluded that Foster’s body had been moved to the crime scene and that murder could not be ruled out.

Despite overwhelming evidence of a cover-up, the media won’t question the official ruling.

Ken Starr, who could find no criminal wrongdoing on the part of the Clintons during his “intensive” probe, confirmed a ruling of suicide. Starr even hired O.J. Simpson’s defense expert to prove his case.

On August 23, 2016, The Daily Mail revealed that FBI agents’ reported interviews documenting that Hillary Clinton’s stinging humiliation of her friend and mentor Vince Foster in front of White House aides triggered the suicide of Vince Foster were missing from where they should be filed at the National Archives.

On the first visit, archivist David Paynter provided the box of records that he said contained the FBI reports of interviews conducted by FBI agents on Foster’s death. 

On a second visit, archivist James Mathis provided what he said were those same documents.

While the box contained dozens of FBI reports concerning Foster’s death – including interviews with the medical examiner, U.S. Park Police officers, and White House aides about the contents of Foster’s office –  the reports on Hillary Clinton’s role in his death were absent.

After filing a Freedom of Information request with the National Archives, Martha Murphy, the archives’ public liaison, reported that she directed a senior archivist to conduct a more thorough review of the relevant FBI files, including those that had not been previously made public in response to FOIA requests.

‘He examined all eight boxes but found no interviews by any investigator that detail either a meeting between Hillary Clinton and Vince Foster or the effects of a meeting between Hillary Clinton and Vince Foster on Vince Foster’s state of mind,’ Murphy reported in an email.

After firing Republican FBI Director William S. Session, President Bill Clinton temporarily replaced him with Floyd I. Clarke and then on September 1, 1993 he Louis Freeh became the FBI Director. 

Louis Freeh coincidentally hired James Comey for his first job.

Right from the start, the Freeh FBI was drenched in controversy. The “screw-ups” were legion—from the exposure of fraudulent FBI crime lab results to the wrongful blaming of an innocent man for the bombings at the Atlanta Olympics—to the bloody standoff and shootout at Ruby Ridge.

But enough about the crimes of the Clinton’s and the hypocrisy of the media who would have chosen to ignore the suspicious timing of President Clinton’s firing of his FBI Director William S. Sessions. We should all just ignore the unmitigated mess James Comey made of Hillary’s email scandal that put our national security at risk while he was serving as the director of the FBI, and instead, focus on a way to blame Comey’s incompetence on President Trump.

 

 

 

 


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