Obama Expected To Release Plan To Close GITMO…And Give It Back To Cuba?

There’s so much to this effort to close GITMO that it’s hard to know where to begin. First of all, one of Obama’s campaign promises was to close GITMO. Here we are late in his second term and he’s still doing everything he can to close this prison for terrorists. We’ve dumped millions into the facility, even building a $750,000 soccer field. The Republicans have been blocking Obama’s efforts but it’s looking more and more like an executive order will be the only way GITMO will close. The second aspect of this Obama plan is that Obama may give GITMO back to Cuba. Raul Castro voiced a desire to have GITMO returned back in January:

Cuba President Raul Castro said that if the United States wants to smooth relations, then the United States must first turn over Guantanamo Bay.

“The reestablishment of diplomatic relations is the start of a process of normalizing bilateral relations, but this will not be possible while the blockade still exists, while they don’t give back the territory illegally occupied by the Guantanamo naval base,” Mr. Castro said, AP reported.

Gitmo was established by the United States in 1903. Cuba has been demanding the United States give it over to its authority for decades.

I wouldn’t put it past Obama to give Guantanamo Bay back to Cuba. This is clearly a political move by Obama who’s protecting his legacy over the safety and security of the American people. Can you imagine having these terrorists housing in the city you live in?

The Pentagon is expected to release a plan next week on President Obama’s years-long effort to close the Guantanamo Bay detention center that suggests a Colorado prison dubbed “the Alcatraz of the Rockies” as one suitable site to relocate expected life-long detainees, Obama administration officials say.

Obama made a campaign promise in his 2008 White House bid to close the facility, arguing the move would be in the United States’ best financial, national security and foreign policy interests and in the name of justice — considering some of the detainees have been held for nearly nine years without trial or sentencing.

However, critics of the promise, including many Republicans, fear transferring detainees to the U.S. mainland as part of an overall closure plan poses too much of a homeland security risk. They also say the president has yet to submit a closure plan and have been critical of the administration recently allowing some known terrorists to return to the Middle East.

The Florence, Colo., prison is among seven U.S. facilities in Colorado, Kansas and South Carolina being considered.

The Pentagon plan represents a last-gasp effort by the administration to convince staunch opponents in Congress that dangerous detainees who can’t be transferred safely to other countries should be housed in a U.S.-based prison.
Read more: FOX News

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