PROTESTS CALL FOR MAYOR TO GO If Planned Mosque Is Built In This NEW JERSEY Town

THE VOTE ON THE PROPOSED MOSQUE IN NEW JERSEY (NOT TENNESSEE) HAS RAISED MORE QUESTIONS THAN ANSWERS. THERE APPEARS TO BE A FAST TRACK FOR THIS MOSQUE TO BE BUILT. WE WILL BE LOOKING INTO THIS FOR AN UPDATE.

Bayonne, NJ residents are getting the full court press from the Muslim community to build a mosque. The residents are protesting with a threat to oust the mayor of the town if the mosque is approved. The truth is that this is happening all over the U.S. as more and more Muslims flood towns. While Christian churches and symbols are being town down or not even allowed in the Middle East, we’re being swamped with the Mosques and the Muslim refugees moving to America.


 

Here’s another example of a mega Mosque protest in Michigan:
(VIDEO) ANGRY AMERICANS PROTEST PROPOSED MEGA MOSQUE IN THEIR NEIGHBORHOOD


With less than a week left before the city zoning board decides whether to approve the plan for a Muslim community center, residents vehemently opposed to the project are putting up signs and organizing a protest at City Hall.

The signs — which read “If the mosque comes, the mayor (goes)” and “No mas (‘No more’ in Spanish), no mosque” — have been posted near the vacant warehouse where the community center would be located at the east end of 24th Street off Avenue F.

A flier for a Jan. 12 meeting of residents opposed to the community center featured a Sept. 11 logo with the word “remember” in block letters.

Joe Wisniewski, 50, of 23rd Street said he and other neighbors put up the signs, and that a grassroots movement of “at least 100” people are against the center primarily because they believe it would bring in additional traffic and noise.

“It’s a quiet area. We don’t want the cars coming and going at all times of the day, even if it’s just on Friday when they have their main services,” he said.

After years of searching for a permanent religious home, the local Muslim community has set its sights on converting the warehouse at 109 E. 24th St. into a community center that would offer, among other things, prayer halls, classrooms and a soup kitchen.

Wisniewski, who has previously suggested a Catholic church be built at the site instead of a Muslim community center, stressed that he and other residents opposing the project aren’t doing so strictly on religious grounds.

“If it was Shoprite coming here, and they were building a store there, I would have the same concerns with parking, how many people are coming, how busy are they when they have their sales…so there’s a lot of issues there,” he said.

Wisniewski added that his group believes the soil at the site may be contaminated, which would mean that construction shouldn’t take place there.

In response to those concerns, Bill Finnerty of Bayonne-based law firm Hughes & Finnerty, who represents the Muslim nonprofit group that is seeking to build the center, said the project would bring a “minimal” increase in traffic, and that there is enough on-site parking for the people who would go to the center.
Via: nj


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