SERIOUS THREAT: Record Number Of Border Crossings By Illegal Kids And Non-Mexicans In Recent Months

We’re having another border surge from Central America and it’s HUGE! Almost 5,000 unaccompanied minors were apprehended just in Septemer and AGAIN in October…an 85% from the same time last year! While we’re all focused on the Syrian refugee chaos, the invasion from our south continues. All I can say is CLOSE THE BORDER NOW!

The Southwest border has broken open in recent weeks, with non-Mexicans — and illegal immigrant children in particular — crossing at a record rate in October, according to Border Patrol statistics that suggest the administration’s victory lap earlier this year was premature.

Worse yet, the increases are borderwide, with every one of the nine Southwest border sectors showing spikes in what the Border Patrol dubs OTMs, or “other than Mexicans.”

Nearly 5,000 unaccompanied children were caught in October, and nearly 3,000 more had been caught in the first half of November — a record pace for those months — and it signals just how closely smuggling cartels and would-be illegal immigrants themselves are paying attention to lax enforcement in the U.S.

— The number of families illegally crossing the southern U.S. border has more than doubled over the same period last fall, prompting concern about a new surge of migrants from Central America.

Many more unaccompanied children are also crossing, with 4,476 apprehended in September — an 85 percent increase over that month in 2014, according to new Border Patrol data.
“If that trend even continues a little bit, if things start to go up in February as they usually do, we could be looking at things getting really high, and by spring, you’re seeing an emergency,” said Adam Isacson, a senior associate at the Washington Office on Latin America, a human rights advocacy group.
Marsha Catron, a spokeswoman for the Department of Homeland Security, says the agency is “closely monitoring this situation,” though the increase “is not entirely inconsistent with historical trends for these months.”
The concern among immigration officials and advocates is that the situation is building up to a repeat of the unprecedented influx on the southern border in 2014, when more than 68,000 unaccompanied children and as many families crossed illegally, mainly into Texas.
The Rio Grande Valley has been the epicenter of both the earlier and the latest influx. In 2014, the region saw 77 percent more unaccompanied children and more than four times as many families caught crossing compared with the previous year. The number of families who crossed this September was 5,273, more than twice the number seen in September 2014.
One likely factor in the rising numbers is the increasing success rate of smugglers who, after crackdowns in Mexico and the U.S. last year, appear to have arranged alternative smuggling routes and payoff relationships with Mexican officials, border analysts say.
A bigger component is thought to be a recent explosion of violence in El Salvador, which has long been plagued by gang warfare. Last year a two-year truce dissolved between the two largest gangs: 18th Street and Mara Salvatrucha, also known as MS-13, both of which originated in Los Angeles. That drove homicides above even previously troubling levels.
During the first 10 months of this year, El Salvador reported nearly 5,500 homicides, according to a congressional report last month. That’s more than any other country not at war, according to Elizabeth Kennedy, a San Diego State University social scientist who has worked with migrants.
By the end of this year, the homicide rate in El Salvador _ a country of 6.5 million people _ may exceed 90 per 100,000, a level of violence, including massacres and killings of police, not seen since the country’s bloody 12-year civil war that ended in 1992.
Kennedy said conditions also remain poor in Guatemala and Honduras _ two other originators of illegal migration to the U.S. _ but El Salvador is worse.
“El Salvador is hemorrhaging people,” Isacson said.
The number of unaccompanied children from El Salvador apprehended at the border more than doubled to 1,433 this September compared with last year.

Via: The Monitor

Via: WT

Join The Conversation: Leave a Comment