SHOCKING: GERMAN VILLAGE Of 102 Forced To Take 750 Muslim Asylum Seekers…Do You Know How Many You’re Getting?

The invasion of Europe continues with the politicians totally disregarding the will of the people. The mayor of the small German town of 102 received an e-mail telling him his town would get 1,000 asylum seekers but then dialed back the number to 750. The town has no infrastructure of this and will certainly suffer because of it. Do you know how many “asylum seekers” are coming or have come to your town? The State Department is really good about keeping this information from the American people. The local agencies who profit per body they bring in don’t want you to know either. I just found out that over 1,300 were brought in to a neighboring town just last year but none of us knew about it until now. Please do your homework on this one and go to the best resource around to find out he number and where they’re from: REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT WATCH
HERE’S WHAT WE KNOW BUT PLEASE KEEP DIGGING AT REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT WATCH:
Click on the link to see the map of where they went: 187 Syrians in  October – 98% Muslim 
Click on the link to see the map of where they went: 595 Somalis in October
Go to this ink to see more: REFUGEE PROCESSING CENTER
GERMAN TOWN TO RECEIVE 750 MUSLIM INVADERS:
SUMTE, Germany — This bucolic, one-street settlement of handsome redbrick farmhouses may for the moment have many more cows than people, but next week it will become one of the fastest growing places in Europe. Not that anyone in Sumte is very excited about it.
In early October, the district government informed Sumte’s mayor, Christian Fabel, by email that his village of 102 people just over the border in what was once Communist East Germany would take in 1,000 asylum seekers.
His wife, the mayor said, assured him it must be a hoax. “It certainly can’t be true” that such a small, isolated place would be asked to accommodate nearly 10 times as many migrants as it had residents, she told him. “She thought it was a joke,” he said.
But it was not. Sumte has become a showcase of the extreme pressures bearing down on Germany as it scrambles to find shelter for what, by the end of the year, could be well over a million people seeking refuge from poverty or wars in Africa, Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan and elsewhere.
In a small concession to the villagers, Alexander Götz, a regional official from Lower Saxony, told them this week that the initial number of refugees, who start arriving on Monday and will be housed in empty office buildings, would be kept to 500, and limited to 750 in all.
Nevertheless, the influx is testing the limits of tolerance and hospitality in Sumte, and across Germany. It is also straining German politics broadly, creating deep divisions in the conservative camp of Chancellor Angela Merkel and energizing a constellation of extremist groups that feel their time has come.
One of the few people, in fact, who seem enthusiastic about the plan for Sumte is Holger Niemann, 32, an admirer of Hitler and the lone neo-Nazi on the elected district council. He rejoices at the opportunities the migrant crisis has offered.
“It is bad for the people, but politically it is good for me,” Mr. Niemann said of the plan, which would leave the German villagers outnumbered by migrants by more than seven to one.
Germans face “the destruction of our genetic heritage” and risk becoming “a gray mishmash,” Mr. Niemann added, predicting that public anxiety over Ms. Merkel’s open-armed welcome to refugees would help demolish a postwar political consensus in Germany built on moderation and compromise.
Unlike those in other European countries, far-right parties in Germany have had little success in national elections, and remain firmly rejected by the overwhelming majority of Germans.
Reinhold Schlemmer, a former Communist who served as the mayor here before and immediately after the collapse of East Germany, said people like Mr. Niemann would “have been put in prison right away” during the Communist era.
“Now they can stand up and preach,” he said. “People say this is democracy, but I don’t think it is democracy to let Nazis say what they want.”

Read more: NYT


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