As a side note, I’m just curious…when did the world agree to forfeit the rainbow (a sign from God to Noah that he would never again flood the earth) as the official symbol for the gay community?

trans military

The Air Force announced policy changes Thursday that will make it more difficult to discharge transgender troops, a move that mirrors one made in March by the Army and puts the Pentagon a step closer to allowing transgender people to serve openly.

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Troops diagnosed with gender dysphoria or who identify as transgender are generally discharged from serving, based on medical grounds. Those decisions have been made by doctors and unit commanders. The new Air Force policy requires those decisions to be reviewed by high-level officials at Air Force headquarters.

“Though the Air Force policy regarding involuntary separation of gender dysphoric Airmen has not changed, the elevation of decision authority to the Director, Air Force Review Boards Agency, ensures the ability to consistently apply the existing policy,” Daniel Sitterly, a top Air Force personnel official, said in a statement.

The Air Force and Army moves follow a number of statements from top Pentagon officials about dismantling the policy allowing transgender troops to be kicked out of the services. Defense Secretary Ashton Carter said this year in response to a question about transgender service that ability to perform military tasks should be the standard for eligibility.

Air Force Secretary Deborah James expressed openness to allowing transgender troops to serve.

“From my point of view, anyone who is capable of accomplishing the job should be able to serve,” James told USA TODAY. “And so I wouldn’t be surprised if this doesn’t come under review.”

Via: USA Today


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