Bryan Kohberger, a 28-year-old criminal justice Ph.D. candidate at Washington State University, is the prime suspect in the brutal murders of four University of Idaho students. Updates on this case have been slow to come out since his arrest on Friday, as key parts of the investigation won’t be released until he appears in court.

As the public anxiously awaits more information on the case, Kohberger’s public defense attorney revealed that the suspect and his father were pulled over twice on their road trip from Washington to Pennsylvania.

Jason LaBar, Kohberger’s extradition hearing attorney, reported that the suspect’s father flew into Spokane, Washington to drive back to Pennsylvania, where their family home is, with his son for the Christmas holiday break.

Speaking to NBC, LaBar addressed the two times Kohberger and his father got pulled over on the lengthy drive.

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“I don’t know whether they were speeding or not or if they were even issued a ticket,” said LaBar. “I just know that they were pulled over in Indiana almost back-to-back. I believe once for speeding and once for [following] too closely to a car in from of them.”

Initially, an Indiana State Police spokesman, reported that he could not find any evidence of Kohberger’s vehicle being pulled over. He said, “We have examined records and do not find any record of any traffic stops or any interactions involving Bryan Kohberger, his father, or any Kohberger.”

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However, on Friday, authorities released bodycam footage from both times Kohberger got pulled over with his father on their way home. They were pulled over just outside of Indianapolis for their first offense, driving too close to the van in front of them. The incident, which took place at about 10:41 pm on December 15, was confirmed by the Hancock County Sheriff’s Department.

The officer who stopped the pair told them that they had been pulled over for driving too closely behind a van. When he asked where they were headed, Kohberger’s father told the officer they were coming from Washington State University and going to Pennsylvania.

The father then tries to explain to the officer that they have been driving for hours, seemingly trying to excuse the driving error. He also strangely brings up a shooting incident at WSU that involved a SWAT team, which the officer knew nothing about.

Kohberger’s dad told the officer there was a “mass shooting” near the university, but it seems that he is referencing a SWAT standoff that took place earlier the same day when a 36-year-old man threatened to kill his roommates and then barricaded himself inside his apartment. When SWAT and other law enforcement arrived, the man began shooting out of his window, prompting officers to fire back, and ended up killing the shooter.

After the officer felt he had sufficiently questioned the pair, he let them off with a verbal warning.

About 9 minutes later, they were stopped again by Indiana State Police. It is much more difficult to hear the conversation in the second video, but they were again let go with just a verbal warning.

In addition to the information on the traffic stops, LaBar also revealed Kohberger’s belief that he will be exonerated from the quadruple murder for which he has been accused. LaBar said, “Given the conversation I had with him and his statement of being exonerated, I would anticipate an entry of not guilty.”

On Tuesday, Kohberger appeared in court where he waived his right to an extradition hearing. The suspect’s mother, sister, and father were present. His mother cried throughout the hearing as her daughter comforted her, and Kohberger reportedly mouthed ‘I love you’ to his mother while inside the courtroom.

Kohberger left the Monroe County Correctional Facility on Wednesday at 6 am to be transported by plane back to Idaho where the murders took place.

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