When Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI) joined radical Democrat lawmakers to call for President Trump’s impeachment, Republicans expressed concern over the possibility of the grandstanding, anti-Trump lawmaker setting himself up for an independent run against Trump in 2020 as a Libertarian candidate. In 2016, former New Mexico governor Gary Johnson, stole support in critical states from Trump when he ran as the Libertarian candidate. In the critical must-win state of MI, Johnson took 3.6% of or 172,136 votes in 2016.

On May 18th, Rep. Justin Amash (R-MI) fired off a series of tweets, joining the chorus of Democrat lawmakers who would like to see President Trump impeached over his handling of Mueller’s phony witch hunt that was initiated after Hillary Clinton’s campaign and the DNC paid for a phony Russian dossier, then used it as a basis for our intelligence community to spy on the Trump campaign. Apparently, Amash, who prides himself on being a “constitutionalist” is less bothered by the spying than Trump’s reaction to the spying.

President Trump responded to Amash’s tweets by calling him a “total lightweight.”

Now, the Libertarian candidate who quit the conservative Congressional Freedom Caucus last month is announcing that he’s also quitting the Republican Party. Is the habitiual quitter setting himself up for a run against Trump in 2020?

NBC News Washington reports- Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan, the only Republican in Congress to support the impeachment of President Donald Trump, said Thursday he is leaving the GOP because he has become disenchanted with partisan politics and “frightened by what I see from it.”

In an opinion article published in the Washington Post, on July 4, Amash said partisan politics is damaging American democracy.

“I am declaring my independence and leaving the Republican Party,” Amash said. “I’m asking you to join me in rejecting the partisan loyalties and rhetoric that divide and dehumanize us.”

Amash was the only Republican in Congress to call for impeachment proceedings against Trump, drawing the ire of many fellow Republicans and Trump.

After announcing his intention to join the Democrats in their desire to impeach Trump, MI Rep. Justin Amash held a town hall in his district, where he was met with a room full of Democrat supporters. Anna Timmer, who worked on multiple campaigns for Amash, starting with his first campaign, bravely stood up in a sea of Democrats and let Amash have it.

On July 1st, The Detroit News reported about a crowded field of Republican candidates who are hoping to unseat the anti-Trump congressman in 2020.

Amash remains ‘confident’ in reelection.

A libertarian Republican who has clashed with party leadership, Amash has dismissed his challengers, saying he’s “absolutely” confident in his district in 2020.

“At the end of the day, people go to vote, and I think they vote on character. I don’t think there’s any comparison, so I’m not worried about it,” he told The Detroit News last month.

But his loss of support from the powerful DeVos family — which had contributed nearly $300,000 to Amash’s campaigns since 2010 — is an undeniable blow.

A spokesman for the GOP mega-donors last month cited “concerns about a lack of representation for their district … and (Amash’s) inability to advance efforts connected to important policy matters.”

The family helped Amash pull through in 2014 when groups such as Right to Life of Michigan and the Michigan Chamber of Commerce backed Ellis in the primary. Ellis raised more than $1.8 million and outspent Amash by $266,000. 

Meanwhile, Democrats see a seat ripe for the plucking. They were recruiting even before Amash broke with Trump over the president’s potential obstruction of justice detailed in special counsel Robert Mueller’s report.

Here’s a quick look at some of the votes by Amash that prove President Trump was correct when he called Amash a “total lightweight.”

Budget resolution to repeal the Affordable Care Act (227-198)

Jan. 13, 2017 

Trump – Supported

Amash – Voted No

S.Con.Res.3 – A concurrent resolution setting forth the congressional budget for the United States Government for the fiscal year 2017 and setting forth the appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2018 through 2026.

Making it easier to seek the death penalty for killing or attempting to kill first responders (271-143)

May 18, 2017

Trump – Supported

Amash – Voted No

H.R.115 – Thin Blue Line Act

Penalizing states and localities that have “sanctuary” laws on immigration (228-195)

June 29, 2017

Trump – Supported

Amash – Voted No

Increasing penalties for undocumented immigrants who re-enter the U.S. after being convicted of certain crimes (257-167)

June 29, 2017

Trump – Supported

Amash – Voted No

H.R.3004 – Kate’s Law

Giving the government more power to deport and deny admission to immigrants suspected of being in gangs (233-175)

Sept. 14, 2017

Trump – Supported

Amash – Voted No

H.R.3697 – Criminal Alien Gang Member Removal Act

Expressing support for the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency and denouncing calls for its abolishment (244-35)

July 18, 2018

Trump – Supported

Amash – Voted No

H.Res.990 – Supporting the officers and personnel who carry out the important mission of the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Making concealed-carry firearm permits valid across state lines (231-198)

Dec. 6, 2017

Trump – Supported

Amash – Voted No

H.R.38 – Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act of 2017

Funding for measures to prevent school violence, including training for officials and threat detection (407-10)

March 14, 2018

Trump – Supported

Amash – Voted No

H.R.4909 – STOP School Violence Act of 2018

Overturning President Trump’s emergency declaration for border wall funding (245-182)

Feb. 26, 2019
Trump – Opposed
Amash – Voted Yes

H.J.Res.46 – Relating to a national emergency declared by the President on February 15, 2019.

Overriding President Trump’s veto of a bill that overturned his emergency declaration for border wall funding (248-181)

March 26

Trump – Opposed

Amash – Voted Yes

H.J.Res.46 – Relating to a national emergency declared by the President on February 15, 2019.


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