On May 19, Michigan’s newly elected Democrat Secretary of State pulled a fast one on citizens when she announced that all registered voters in the crucial swing state of Michigan, where voters went for Trump by only 10,700 votes in 2016, will receive unsolicited applications for absentee ballots in November.

“By mailing applications, we have ensured that no Michigander has to choose between their health and their right to vote,” Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson wrote in a statement to the public.

President Trump warned about mail-in-voting schemes, telling Republicans they should fight very hard against it, adding that there’s a “tremendous potential for voter fraud,” adding, “and for whatever reason,” voting by mail “doesn’t work out well for Republicans.”

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Shortly after Michigan’s Democrat Secretary of State sent out unsolicited ballots to every person on the voter rolls, a decision was made by Judge Cynthia Stephens, a Democrat Governor Jennifer Granholm appointee, that allowed mail-in ballots postmarked by November 2 — the day before Election Day to be counted in the November election.

Judge Cynthia Stephens

In addition, Judge Stephens said that strangers can return other people’s ballots — normally a felony — between 5:01 p.m. on Friday, October 30, and 8:00 p.m. on November 3, the moment that polling places are supposed to close on Election Day.

However, that decision was overturned in what was reportedly a straight 3-0 decision, with the panel of judges ruling that any changes to election rules must be approved by the state legislature.

Now, in a huge blow to advocates of voter fraud in Michigan, the Michigan Court of Appeals has blocked a ruling by a lower court that gave a 14-day extension for absentee ballots to arrive at the clerk’s office.  The 14-day extension was celebrated by Democratic officials, like Democrat Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson.

AJC reports- Absentee ballots must arrive by Election Day to be counted, the Michigan Court of Appeals said Friday, blocking a 14-day extension that had been ordered by a lower court and embraced by key Democratic officials.

The appeals court, in a 3-0 opinion, said any changes must rest with the Legislature, not the judiciary.

Absentee ballot extensions ordered by judges in Wisconsin and Indiana have also been overturned by higher courts.

Michigan’s ability to handle a flood of ballots will be closely watched in a state that was narrowly won by President Donald Trump in 2016. Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson last week said 2.7 million people had requested absentee ballots, a result of a change in the law that makes them available to any voter.

Michigan law says absentee ballots must be turned in by 8 p.m. on Election Day to be valid. But Court of Claims Judge Cynthia Stephens had ordered that any ballots postmarked by Nov. 2 could be counted if they arrived within two weeks after the Nov. 3 election.

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