Former President George W. Bush delivered a heartfelt and sometimes humorous eulogy today at the end of the funeral for his father. Watch the video below and you’ll see how he gently touches the casket as he walks by.

The National Cathedral in Washington, D.C., was the location for the service for former President George H.W. Bush. several dignitaries spoke but the most touching was from George W. Bush because he shared moments of love he showed to his family and friends.

The most personal and touching moment in the 10-minute speech by the former president was when it was time for a final goodbye:

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“Last Friday when I was told he had minutes to live, I called him. I said ‘Dad, I love you and you’ve been a wonderful father.’ And the last words he would ever say on earth were, ‘I love you, too.'”

The eulogy was not only about how Bush 43’s father died but how he lived a life of fullness a vigor:

“I once heard it said of man that the idea is to die young as late as possible.”

“He taught us that a day was not meant to be wasted. He played golf at a legendary pace. I always wonder why he insisted on speed golf. Here’s my conclusion: he played fast so he could move on to the next event, to enjoy the rest of the day, to expend his enormous energy, to live it all.”

“He was born with just two settings, full throttle, then sleep.”

“Service is noble”

“Dad could relate to people from all walks of life. He was an empathetic man. He valued character over pedigree, and he was no cynic. He looked for the good in each person and he usually found it. Dad taught us that public service is noble and necessary, that one can serve with integrity and hold true to the important values like faith and family. He strongly believed that it was important to give back to the community and country in which one lived. He recognized that serving others enriched the giver’s soul.”

Bush went on to discuss the pain of his father losing a child to leukemia:

“None of his disappointments could compare with one of life’s greatest tragedies, the loss of a young child. Jeb and I were too young to remember the pain and agony he and Mom felt when our 3-year-old sister died. We only learned later that Dad, a man of quiet faith, prayed for her daily. He was sustained by the love of the Almighty and the real and enduring love of her mom. Dad always believed that one day he would hug his precious Robin again.”

“He married his sweetheart”

Every day of his 73 years of marriage, Dad taught us all what it means to be a great husband. He married his sweetheart. He adored her. He laughed and cried with her. He was dedicated to her totally. In his old age, Dad enjoyed watching police show reruns, the volume on high, all the while holding Mom’s hand. After Mom died, Dad was strong, but all he really wanted to do was hold Mom’s hand again. Of course Dad taught me another special lesson: He showed me what it means to be a president who serves with integrity, leads with courage and acts with love in his heart for the citizens of our country.

When the history books are written, they will say that George H.W. Bush was a great president of the United States, a diplomat of unmatched skill, a commander in chief of formidable accomplishment, and a gentleman who executed the duties of his office with dignity and honor. In his inaugural address, the 41st president of the United States said this: “We cannot hope only to leave our children a bigger car, a bigger bank account, we must hope to give them a sense of what it means to be a loyal friend, a loving parent, a citizen who leaves his home, his neighborhood and town better than he found it.”

What do we want the men and women who work with us to say when we are no longer there—that we were more driven to succeed than anyone around us, or that we stopped to ask if a sick child had gotten better and stayed a moment there to trade a word of friendship?

Well, Dad, we’re going to remember you for exactly that and much more, and we’re going to miss you. Your decency, sincerity, and kind soul will stay with us forever.

So through our tears, let us know the blessings of knowing and loving you, a great and noble man, the best father a son or daughter could have. And in our grief, let us smile knowing that Dad is hugging Robin and holding Mom’s hand again.


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