“The Rules of the House dictate minimum standards of decency and decorum, setting forth how Members must conduct themselves during debate. However, Majority Members of the Committee have demonstrated they either do not understand the Rules or simply are under the mistaken belief the Rules do not apply to them.” – Rep. Doug Collins

Once again, the Democrats don’t feel the rules apply to them so they continue to go rogue when it comes to decorum during congressional oversight hearings.

Several Democrats have already broken the rules of House decorum in past hearings including Eric Swalwell who called President Trump a “pathetic person.”

This is why Rep. Doug Collins sent a reminder letter to Democrats to put them on notice that they need to observe the rules:

The Daily Caller reports that House Judiciary Committee ranking member Doug Collins accused Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler of scheduling a “mock impeachment inquiry” of the president for Monday as opposed to a legitimate congressional oversight hearing.

The title for the hearing tomorrow is already off base because it insinuates that there was obstruction by President Trump in the Mueller Report: “Lessons from the Mueller Report: Presidential Obstruction and Other Crimes”. Other crimes???

John Dean and others will testify to try and push the obstruction narrative that Democrats are seeking.

The hearing is basically an impeachment inquiry without being called an impeachment inquiry. The problem for Democrats is they are prohibited from accusing the president of a crime, according to House rules.

Collins wrote to Nadler to remind him:

The fact you are attempting to make the case for starting an impeachment inquiry has no bearing on the applicability of the Rules. Outside of such an inquiry, Members are prohibited from accusing the President of a crime or alluding to potential impeachable offenses. Jefferson’s Manual further states:

Although wide latitude is permitted in debate on a proposition to impeach the President, Members must abstain from language personally offensive; and Members must abstain from comparisons to the personal conduct of sitting Members of the House or Senate. Furthermore, when impeachment is not the pending business on the floor, Members may not refer to evidence of alleged impeachable offenses by the President contained in a communication from an independent counsel pending before a House committee, although they may refer to the communication, itself, within the confines of proper decorum in debate, and may not otherwise suggest that the President has done something worthy of censure or impeachment.

Collins has been a superstar during the hearings where he pushes back on the Democrats with facts and hardball questions. Tomorrow should be no exception.


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