An entire New York City high school temporarily went remote as nearly 2,000 migrants used the gymnasium for a storm shelter.

Migrants were relocated from Brooklyn’s Floyd Bennett Field to James Madison High School on January 10th due to potential flooding and windy conditions.

James Madison High School announced:

JMHS will be remote on 1/10/24.

Dear Families,

I am writing with an update regarding the activation of James Madison High School as a temporary overnight respite center due to the forecast of potential high winds and flooding conditions beginning this evening through tomorrow morning.

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To ensure a smooth transition for families temporarily sheltering overnight in the building, our school building will be closed on Wednesday, January 10 and school will be in session remotely for all students. Students should plan to log on and participate in their classes from home. For information about digital learning tools, applications, and platforms used by New York City Public Schools, please visit schools.nyc.gov/digitallearning.

WATCH:

“Approximately 1.9k migrants from Floyd Bennett Field will be temporarily relocated to James Madison High School The school will be shut down and students will attend virtual classes This incident confirms what we knew all along, the camp at Floyd Bennett Field is unsustainable,” New York State Assembly candidate Thomas Sullivan said.

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The New York Post reports:

Concerns that torrential rains and powerful winds would collapse a massive migrant tent at Floyd Bennett Field led to the move Tuesday night — though migrants had already been cleared out of James Madison High School at 4:30 a.m. Wednesday.

Despite their early departure, which a source described to The Post as “madness,” the school remained remote on Wednesday at the principal’s request, City Hall said.

The sheer number of workers needed to smoothly transport the 1,900 asylum seekers made the chaotic scene feel “like a concert,” the source added.

Photos shared on social media platform X by Mayor Eric Adams appeared to show migrant families, including children, sleeping on the floor of the school’s gymnasium.

“As of 0427 Hours our temporary relocation of Floyd Bennett Field HERRC guests to James Madison High School was completed and all guests safely returned to Floyd Bennett Field HERRC,” the Office of Emergency Management wrote alongside the photos.

The migrants — who were moved to the school around 5 p.m. Tuesday as a precaution against the storm — were met with fierce backlash from some in the neighborhood. As a result, Assemblyman Michael Novakhov (R-Brooklyn) called for a rally Wednesday morning outside the high school to protest the disruption of students’ education.

Collin Rugg writes:

Locals in Brooklyn are protesting after James Madison High School was closed to students so migrants could setup camp in the high school.

A shouting match took place outside of the school between anti-illegal migrant protesters and pro-illegal migrant protesters.

One angry grandmother blamed Biden for the situation.

“I blame the president first of all. But you can’t get to him, the mayor and the governor for not stepping up and voicing their outrage at how are we supposed to support all these people.”

Daily Caller added:

Adams and several other mayors of sanctuary cities, including Denver and Chicago, requested additional funding from the White House and Congress, as well as coordination with state and local governments, to deal with migrants. Denver has received more than 34,000 migrants, and Democratic Mayor Mike Johnston said “cities will have to look at dramatically reducing the amount of services we offer” due to the migrants.

Adams announced a 5% budget cut for all city services in September, but migrants are still straining the city resources, he said at a September event.

“Never in my life have I had a problem that I didn’t see an ending to. I don’t see an ending to this. … This issue will destroy New York City,” Adams said at the event. “Every community in this city is going to be impacted. … We have a $12 billion deficit that we’re going to have to cut – every service in this city is going to be impacted.”

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