We’ve been reporting on this unbelievable trend in non-citizen (green card holders AND illegal aliens) voting across Maryland since August. The city of College Park,  Maryland is the latest to decide on non-citizen voting by a slim margin. Tucker Carlson is as outraged by this as we are:

A city council in Maryland has voted in favor of allowing resident non-citizens such as illegal immigrants to participate in local elections.
The charter amendment passed with its original wording with a vote of 4-3, with one abstention from District 1 Councilman Fazlul Kabir.

The city council in College Park, home to the University of Maryland campus, has joined six other towns that allow green-card holders, illegal immigrants and other non-citizens to vote in local elections.

In August, most of the residents voiced their opposition to the amendment letting all non-citizen residents to vote in local elections, but by Tuesday night, the majority wrote to the mayor in support of the proposal, Wojahn told the Post.

The city hall meeting was packed and almost two-dozen people spoke against or for the motion expanding the voting privileges, Fox 5 DC reported. Local police were on hand due to previous threats and harassment over the motion.

Both sides clashed verbally – with one man allegedly being called a Nazi while waiting to voice his opinion against the motion.

THIS IS SHOCKING! THE HISTORY OF ILLEGAL VOTING:

The shocking thing is that Wikipedia says people who feel like they are citizens can vote…Huh???

The right of foreigners to vote in the United States has historically been a contentious issue. A foreigner, in this context, is an alien or a person who is not a citizen of the United States.

Since 1996, a federal law has prohibited non-citizens from voting in federal elections, punishing them by fines, imprisonment, inadmissibility, and deportation. Exempt from punishment is any non-citizen who “reasonably believed at the time of voting that he or she was a citizen of the United States,” had a parent who is or was a citizen, and began permanently living in the United States before turning 16 years old. The federal law does not prohibit non-citizens from voting in state or local elections, but no state has allowed non-citizens to vote in state elections since Arkansas became the last state to outlaw non-citizen voting in 1926. 12 local governments, 11 of them in Maryland, allow non-citizens to vote in their local elections (Takoma Park, Barnesville, Martin’s Additions, Somerset, Chevy Chase Sections 3 and 5, Glen Echo, Garrett Park, Hyattsville, College Park, and Mount Rainer). San Francisco allows noncitizens parents to vote in School Board elections (beginning in 2018).

However, over 40 states or territories, including colonies before the Declaration of Independence, have at some time given at least some aliens voting rights in some or all elections. For example, in 1875, the Supreme Court in Minor v. Happersett noted that “citizenship has not in all cases been made a condition precedent to the enjoyment of the right of suffrage. Thus, in Missouri, persons of foreign birth, who have declared their intention to become citizens of the United States, may under certain circumstances vote.”

By 1900, nearly half of the states and territories had some experience with voting by aliens, and for some the experience lasted more than half a century. At the turn of the twentieth century, anti-immigration feeling ran very high, and Alabama stopped allowing aliens to vote by way of a constitutional change in 1901; Colorado followed suit in 1902, Wisconsin in 1908, and Oregon in 1914. Just as the nationalism unleashed by the War of 1812 helped to reverse the alien suffrage policies inherited from the late eighteenth century, World War I caused a sweeping retreat from the progressive alien suffrage policies of the late nineteenth century. In 1918, Kansas, Nebraska, and South Dakota all changed their constitutions to purge alien suffrage, and Texas ended the practice of non-citizen voting in primary elections by statute. Indiana and Texas joined the trend in 1921, followed by Mississippi in 1924 and, finally, Arkansas in 1926. In 1931, political scientist Leon Aylsworth noted: “For the first time in over a hundred years, a national election was held in 1928 in which no alien in any state had the right to cast a vote for a candidate for any office – national, state, or local.”

Read more: Fox News


Join The Conversation. Leave a Comment.