We previously reported on the hijab-wearing shampoo model for L’Oreal. The ad is for shampoo but the model is covering up her hair…go figure. Amena Khan was to be the new face of L’Oreal’s diversity campaign…YAWN! Well, as it turns out, this model is not really for diversity when it comes to including the Jewish population. The Daily Caller discovered anti-Israel tweets from Khan that were also “borderline” anti-semitic. Wow! You’d think L’Oreal would have researched this woman’s tweets and stance since they’re so interested in diversity. As it turns out, both Revlon and L’Oreal hired antisemite hijab-wearing models for their “diversity campaigns”…

REVLON IS DOING THE SAME THING!

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L’Oreal released a statement saying they were “recently made aware” of the tweets. Khan stepped down today as the model for the shampoo:

A L’Oreal shampoo model has stepped down after her anti-Israel tweets were uncovered by The Daily Caller.

However, after going through Khan’s tweet history, TheDC uncovered a string of tweets from 2014 that were virulently anti-Israel and borderline anti-semitic.

 Khan accused Israel of being an “illegal” genocidal state that routinely murders children and other Palestinian civilians.

“You’re complicit in the supplying of weapons to a terrorist state,” she tweeted at then-British PM David Cameron. “You offered ‘staunch support’ of genocide.”

Khan announced on Monday that she would be stepping down from the hair campaign because of the 2014 tweets.

“I deeply regret the content of the tweets I made in 2014, and sincerely apologise for the upset and hurt that they have caused,” she wrote. “Championing diversity is one of my passions, I don’t discriminate against anyone. I have chosen to delete them as they do not represent the message of harmony that I stand for.”

OUR PREVIOUS REPORT ON THE L’OREAL “DIVERSITY” CAMPAIGN:

Just when you think you’ve seen it all…another company puts diversity before market share and creates the most mind-boggling marketing campaign we’ve seen in a long time. In an effort to sell their hair care products, L’Oreal has chosen to feature a woman whose religion prohibits her hair from being shown as an example of how great their hair product works. Oh well, the woman in the hijab may not sell any hair products, but L’Oreal has successfully pandered to the feminist crowd, who of interestingly enough, doesn’t seem to have any problem with submissive women…

Breitbart News reports that L’Oréal Paris UK has cast a woman who wears an Islamic headscarf as a model in a hair care product campaign.
Youtuber and Instagram personality Amena Khan called the L’Oréal hair care ad campaign, launched Monday, “game changing” for showcasing a woman who completely covers her hair.

“How many brands are doing things like this? Not many. They’re literally putting a girl in a headscarf – whose hair you can’t see – in a hair campaign,” she told the British edition of Vogue.

The fashion magazine applauded the “conversations” the ad will “provoke”, saying that L’Oréal has now “democratised” its “Worth It” messaging.

“Whether or not your hair is on display it doesn’t affect how much you care about it,” Ms. Khan says in her portion of the one minute-ad which featured other “diverse British ambassadors and influencers”.

Last year, L’Oréal Paris UK fired its first transgender ‘ambassador’ Munroe Bergdorf, then hailed as the new “face of modern diversity”, after Bergdorf made racist comments online about the “violent” white “race”, later claiming that “all white people benefit from racism”.

According to a survey of major advertisers undertaken in August 2017, companies are putting ‘diversity’ above marketplace relevance, with more than one-third of advertisers saying the approach was adopted to “prevent perceived discrimination”.

 

 


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