Rep. Joaquin Castro doubled down and refused to delete the tweet he published yesterday outing Trump donors in San Antonio. He published the list of top donors with this comment:

Sad to see so many San Antonians as 2019 maximum donors to Donald Trump — the owner of ⁦Bill Miller BarBQ⁩, owner of the ⁦Historic Pearl, realtor Phyllis Browning, etc⁩.
Their contributions are fueling a campaign of hate that labels Hispanic immigrants as ‘invaders.’

He denied that what he did was targeting Trump supporters for threats and harassment even though he was bombarded with people telling him what he did was wrong.

Republican leader Kevin McCarthy tweeted to Castro and then anti-Trump hacks published Kevin McCarthy’s donor list!

McCarthy tweeted: Targeting and harassing Americans because of their political beliefs is shameful and dangerous. What happened to “when they go low, we go high?” Or does that no longer matter when your brother is polling at 1%? Americans deserve better.

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Rep. Castro responded: No one was targeted or harassed in my post. You know that. All that info is routinely published. You’re trying to distract from the racism that has overtaken the GOP and the fact that President Trump spends donor money on thousands of ads about Hispanics “invading” America. 

Donald Trump has put a target on the back of millions. And you’re too cowardly or agreeable to say anything about it. How about I stop mentioning Trump’s public campaign donors and he stops using their money for ads that fuel hate?

Twisting the truth that over one million illegals will be coming to our border this year is, in fact, an invasion. Many of the groups even come holding the flag of their home country!

The Castro brothers have amom who is a radical from way back so the apples haven’t fallen far from the tree:

According to the Atlantic: Their mother, Rosie Castro, had been a fiery community organizer in San Antonio during the Chicano movement of the 1960s and ’70s; after an unsuccessful run for city council in 1971, three years before Joaquin and Julián were born, she’d remained a political force in San Antonio, chairing the county chapter of La Raza Unida, a Chicano third party, and running other progressives’ political campaigns. The twins had grown up tagging along to rallies, parades, and political functions. As Julián recalled in a college essay later published in an anthology called Writing for Change, political slogans “rang in my ears like war cries”: “Viva La Raza!” “Black and Brown United!”

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