The ’60 Minutes’ interview of Andrew McCabe exposes the intel agencies as rogue political hacks who wanted to spy on President Trump.

They also wanted to invoke the 25th Amendment to oust a sitting president (transcript and video below), according to McCabe.

President Trump tweeted out criticism of McCabe’s behavior after the interview aired:

Wow, so many lies by now disgraced acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe. He was fired for lying, and now his story gets even more deranged. He and Rod Rosenstein, who was hired by Jeff Sessions (another beauty), look like they were planning a very illegal act, and got caught

 

The  video and transcript of the exchange between CBS’ Scott Pelley and McCabe are below:

Scott Pelley: What was it specifically that caused you to launch the counterintelligence investigation?

Andrew McCabe: It’s many of those same concerns that cause us to be concerned about a national security threat. And the idea is, if the president committed obstruction of justice, fired the director of the of the FBI to negatively impact or to shut down our investigation of Russia’s malign activity and possibly in support of his campaign, as a counterintelligence investigator you have to ask yourself, “Why would a president of the United States do that?” So all those same sorts of facts cause us to wonder is there an inappropriate relationship, a connection between this president and our most fearsome enemy, the government of Russia?

Scott Pelley: Are you saying that the president is in league with the Russians?

Andrew McCabe: I’m saying that the FBI had reason to investigate that. Right, to investigate the existence of an investigation doesn’t mean someone is guilty. I would say, Scott, if we failed to open an investigation, under those circumstances, we wouldn’t be doing our jobs.

Scott Pelley: When you decided to launch these two investigations, was the deputy attorney general, Rod Rosenstein, onboard with that.

Andrew McCabe: Absolutely.

Rod Rosenstein has spent 28 years at the Department of Justice. A Republican, he was appointed by President Trump as deputy attorney general, number two at the department. Mr. Trump’s firing of James Comey on May 9, 2017, set off a week of crisis meetings between Rosenstein, who was in charge of the Russia investigation and acting FBI director Andrew McCabe.

Andrew McCabe: I can’t describe to you accurately enough the pressure and the chaos that Rod and I were trying to operate under at that time. It was incredibly turbulent, incredibly stressful. And it was clear to me that that stress was— was impacting the deputy attorney general. We talked about why the president had insisted on firing the director and whether or not he was thinking about the Russia investigation and did that impact his decision. And in the context of that conversation, the deputy attorney general offered to wear a wire into the White House. He said, “I never get searched when I go into the White House. I could easily wear a recording device. They wouldn’t know it was there.” Now, he was not joking.  He was absolutely serious. And in fact, he brought it up in the next meeting we had. I never actually considered taking him up on the offer. I did discuss it with my general counsel and my leadership team back at the FBI after he brought it up the first time.

Scott Pelley: The point of Rosenstein wearing the wire into a meeting with the president was what? What did he hope to obtain?

Andrew McCabe: I can’t characterize what Rod was thinking or what he was hoping at that moment. But the reason you would have someone wear a concealed recording device would be to collect evidence and in this case, what was the true nature of the president’s motivation in calling for the firing of Jim Comey?

Scott Pelley: The general counsel of the FBI and the leadership team you spoke with said what about this idea?

Andrew McCabe: I think the general counsel had a heart attack. And when he got up off the floor, he said, “I, I, that’s a bridge too far. We’re not there yet.”

Scott Pelley: That it wasn’t necessary at that point in the investigation to escalate it to that level.

Andrew McCabe: That’s correct.

But McCabe says Rosenstein raised another idea. The 25th Amendment to the constitution allows the vice president and a majority of the cabinet to remove the president.

Andrew McCabe: Discussion of the 25th Amendment was simply, Rod raised the issue and discussed it with me in the context of thinking about how many other cabinet officials might support such an effort. I didn’t have much to contribute, to be perfectly honest, in that— conversation. So I listened to what he had to say. But, to be fair, it was an unbelievably stressful time. I can’t even describe for you how many things must have been coursing through the deputy attorney general’s mind at that point. So it was really something that he kinda threw out in a very frenzied chaotic conversation about where we were and what we needed to do next.

Scott Pelley: What seemed to be coursing through the mind of the deputy attorney general was getting rid of the president of the United States

Andrew McCabe: Well—

Pelley: One way or another.

Andrew McCabe: I can’t confirm that. But what I can say is the deputy attorney general was definitely very concerned about the president, about his capacity, and about his intent at that point in time.

Scott Pelley: How did he bring up the idea of the 25th amendment to you?

Andrew McCabe: Honestly, I don’t remember. He, it was just another kinda topic that he jumped to in the midst of a wide-ranging conversation.

Scott Pelley: Seriously? (LAUGH) Just—

Andrew McCabe: Yeah—

Scott Pelley: —another topic

Andrew McCabe: Yeah.

Scott Pelley: Did you counsel him on that?

Andrew McCabe: I didn’t. I mean, he was discussing other cabinet members and whether or not people would support such an idea, whether or not other cabinet members would share, his belief that the president was — was really concerning, was concerning Rod at that time.

Scott Pelley: Rosenstein was actually openly talking about whether there was a majority of the cabinet who would vote to remove the president.

Andrew McCabe: That’s correct. Counting votes or possible votes.

Scott Pelley: Did he assign specific votes to specific people?

Andrew McCabe: No, not that I recall.

Scott Pelley: As you’re sitting in this meeting in the Justice Department, talking about removing the president of the United States, you were thinking what?

Andrew McCabe: How did I get here? Confronting these confounding legal issues of such immense importance, not just to the FBI but to the entire country, it was— it was disorienting.

President Trump is correct…Deranged


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