Senator Ted Cruz set the record straight after Colin Kaepernick tweeted out a portion of the ‘Fourth of July’speech by Frederick Douglass

Cruz added the full context to the passage that is from  Douglass’ speech, “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?”

Kaepernick posted this short portion of the speech:

“What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence? This Fourth of July is yours, not mine…There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices more shocking and bloody than are the people of these United States at this very hour.”

Kaepernick also posted a video of the speech with drawings showing American slaves from the Civil War with videos showing police using force against blacks.

Cruz responded with quotes and explanations of why Douglass’ speech is pro-America  but anti-slavery:

“You quote a mighty and historic speech by the great abolitionist Frederick Douglass but without context, many modern readers will misunderstand.”

Cruz says that Douglass is not anti-American and posts quotes giving more context to the speech:

“Allow me to say, in conclusion, notwithstanding the dark picture I have this day presented, of the state of the nation, I do not despair of this country.

“There are forces in operation, which must inevitably, work the downfall of slavery. ‘The arm of the Lord is not shortened,’ and the doom of slavery is certain.”

The anti-slavery quotes from the speech are followed by positive comments about America and the Declaration of Independence:

“I, therefore, leave off where I began, with hope. While drawing encouragement from ‘the Declaration of Independence,’ the great principles it contains, and the genius of American Institutions, my spirit is also cheered by the obvious tendencies of the age.”

Cruz concludes with a suggestion for everyone to read the entire speech:

“Let me encourage everyone, READ THE ENTIRE SPEECH; it is powerful, inspirational, and historically important in bending the arc of history towards justice.”

Cruz added a link to the full text of the speech.

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