Jesse Jackson has been getting away with being one of the most notorious extortionists in history for decades. He’s managed to get away with using his Rainbow Push Coalition Organization as a cover for shaking down businesses and business with little coverage from the media while escaping any serious legal consequences. He loved Donald Trump when he was a billionaire businessman and was able to offer him some form of financial benefit, but that was before he became one of the most beloved Republican Presidents in modern history…

Here’s a 1999 video of Jesse Jackson praising Donald Trump for his contribution to the black community, awarding him with a lifetime achievement award for African Americans:

What a difference a few years (and an [R] behind your name can make:

WFB – While speaking to a crowd at the “Ministers March for Justice” Rev. Jesse Jackson suggested that President Trump should be worried about gaining citizenship in heaven.

“Trump says you must be able to speak the language of English, [be] qualified, and have a job skill,” Jackson said Monday. “Jesus would not qualify to come in Trump’s country—he would not qualify to get into Jesus’ kingdom.”

It’s difficult to understand Jackson in the video below, as he mumbles through much of his commentary. (For translation, see quotes above):

The “Ministers March for Justice,” was spearheaded by Rev. Al Sharpton and featured ministers from various traditions united in opposing the Trump administration. The event took place on the 54th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s March on Washington, and Jackson did not shy away from using religious language to judge the president.

After judging Trump’s ability to enter heaven, he quoted part of a passage from the Gospel of Matthew, in which Jesus says what he will tell his followers at the Final Judgment.

Is the notorious shake down artist Jesse Jackson really one to be deciding who will and who will not be given admittance to heaven? 

In 2006, government watchdog Judicial Watch released a report that revealed new details about the intimidation and shakedown tactics of Jesse Jackson’s Rainbow Push Coalition.

WND – The report, “Jesse Jackson Exposed,” claims Jackson is “an extortionist who uses his influence as a civil rights leader to essentially blackmail wealthy corporations with absurd discrimination threats.”

Included, the group says, are “incriminating admissions from Jackson made under oath at trial.”

Among the tactics highlighted in the report are:

Jackson lobbied the Federal Communications Commission to block companies seeking government approval to merge until they donate money to Rainbow Push.

Jackson publicly chastised Toyota for running an ad Jackson deemed “racist.” After Toyota pulled the ad, Jackson threatened a boycott the automaker to force it to launch a $7.8 million “diversity program.”

Jackson installed one of his friends, J.L. Armstrong, in a management position at Toyota to determine which organizations would receive $700 million in contracts awarded by Toyota.

Minority businesses pay Jackson’s “Trade Bureau” a fee to help extort lucrative contracts from corporations. During the trial, Jackson compared the Trade Bureau to “Noah’s Ark,” claiming minority businesses and organizations had to be inside the “ark” to survive.

 

Judicial Watch brought the lawsuit against Jackson, his son Jonathan Jackson and Rainbow Push Coalition on behalf of Rev. Jesse Lee Peterson, a black minister and founder of the Los Angeles-based Brotherhood Organization for a New Destiny.

Peterson wrote a book titled, “Scam,” that takes Jackson to task as one of America’s “self-appointed” black leaders.

“I don’t recall the entire black race in this country taking a national vote to elect Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, Louis Farrakhan, the NAACP, California Congresswoman Maxine Waters, the Congressional Black Caucus or liberal black preachers as our leaders,” Peterson writes, “yet they’ve seized the mantle of leadership and claim to speak for all blacks in this nation.”

Another expose of Jackson, Kenneth Timmerman’s book “Shakedown: Exposing the real Jesse Jackson,” goes back several decades, including his ordination as a reverend.

“I describe a two to three year process for earning that title,” Timmerman said. “Jesse Jackson got himself ordained two months after Martin Luther King was shot. It was essentially a ‘political ordination,’ a ‘shotgun ordination.’ He did not go through the long procedure. He was not licensed to preach, as far as I could determine. I went to the church where he was ordained. He did not go through this two-year process. He never submitted himself to the authority of the church. He has never had a church himself, and he has been accountable to no one.” Timmerman asserts Jackson “is not doing things to help the black community. Jesse Jackson is … to help himself first.”

 

 


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