Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Il.) has been one of Trump’s fiercest critics from within the Republican Party.  He has also been a vocal advocate for escalating the conflict in Ukraine, demanding that the US impose a ‘no fly zone’ in the country.

Twitter began a pilot program where the platform will put a label on Tweets that are misleading or lack context.  Currently, the program is only visible to a small amount of users.

In his relentless drive to push the United States in to war with Russia, Kinzinger posted a picture of Ukrainian children waving soldiers off to war.  Twitter labeled the Tweet ‘misleading’ after it was revealed that the picture was from 2016 and not from the current conflict in Ukraine.

Kinzinger claims to be opposed to spreading misinformation with a Twitter bio that reads “Aggressively calling out conspiracy theories, early and often.”

The Post Millenial Reports

 

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Twitter has started placing “misleading” labels on Ukraine-related tweets posted by anti-Trump Rep. Adam Kinzinger’s (R-IL) Twitter account.

Kinzinger, the vocal Trump critic currently representing the 16th congressional district of Illinois, has recently been flagged by Twitter for attempting to pass off a years-old image as a current-day depiction of Russia’s war in Ukraine.

While the Big Tech platform’s cautionary language isn’t an explicit ban or restriction on Kinzinger’s account, it does present viewers with a warning on the debunked tweet that the content may not be all it’s chalked up to be.

“This photo is misleading as it could be interpreted as being current due to what is happening now in Ukraine,” the label reads on Kinzinger’s late February tweet.

The notice, mentioning readers added context they’d wanted viewers to know, adds that the photo in question is from 2016. A link is provided to reverse image search engine Tineye. Twitter’s pilot program is visible to a small set of users. Context has to be found helpful by others to appear on a tweet, Twitter noted.

 

 

 

 

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