Give up your bump-fire stock or else! The state of Massachusetts mailed letters to all licensed gun owners in the state on Thursday demanding they surrender any bump-fire stocks (see video below for how they work) or other newly banned firearms accessories to police.

The letter warns that those who currently own a bump-fire stock or other newly prohibited item must turn them into police by May 2018 or face arrest and prosecution.

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The big problem with this is that there is no registry to know how many or who owns the bump-fire stocks so how will they know who to come after? This is just another knee-jerk attempt at something to make the anti-gun crowd happy.

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Washington Free Beacon reports:

The Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety and Security, which oversees the state’s registry of Firearms Identification cards, said it had begun mailing a letter to all registered gun owners in the state warning that once the state’s ban on bump-fire stocks, trigger cranks, and other firearms accessories designed to help increase a semi-automatic firearm’s rate of fire takes effect on Feb. 1, 2018, they will be forced to surrender those devices or face prosecution. The agency said the letters have already been sent and Massachusetts gun owners should be receiving them shortly.

“It went out snail mail so license holders should be receiving as we speak [or] in the coming days,” Felix Browne, a spokesperson for the Executive Office of Public Safety and Security, told the Washington Free Beacon.

The agency said there is no registry of bump-fire stocks, and authorities don’t know how many bump-fire stocks are in the state or who owns them. Browne said the letters were being sent to registered gun owners because the bump-fire stock ban required they be notified of the new regulations.

“Effective 90 days from the enactment of the bill—February 1, 2018—the new law will also prohibit possession of bump stocks or trigger cranks, including possession in a private home,” the letter reads in part. “There are no exceptions to this prohibition for licensed firearm owners: an FID card, a License to Carry, or even a license to possess a machine gun will not authorize possession of a bump stock or a trigger crank.”

HOW A BUMP-FIRE STOCK WORKS:

 


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