Two days ago, in revealing article about the sexual violence illegal immigrant women and girls face on their dangerous trek from  Mexico and South America, the New York Times inadvertently proved President Trump is correct about the violence illegal alien women face on our southern border, while exposing the inaccuracies in the “reporting” about crime on the McAllen, TX border by CNN’s Jim Acosta.

On January 10, 2019, President Trump traveled to the border town of McAllen, Texas, where he met with and spoke to law enforcement and U.S. border agents. In the video below, US Border Patrol

President Trump appeared with a large group of US Border Patrol and ICE agents and local law enforcement, in the video below, where he implored Democrats to take the politics out of their resistance against him and his agenda, and instead, support a the building of a wall on our southern border to protect our nation.

On the same day as Trump’s visit, CNN’s activist White House reporter, Jim Acosta visited McAllen, Texas in an attempt to disprove the President’s claims of violence on the border. Acosta interviewed a man who claims to be a lifetime resident of McAllen, Texas (Acosta only identifies him as “Jose”). “Jose” claims the border town is completely safe…with no crime at all. Acosta stood on a border that was crawling with DHS agents and Secret Service in advance of President Trump’s visit and attempted to prove how safety at the border is not an issue.

Only two days ago, in their article titled,‘You Have to Pay With Your Body’: The Hidden Nightmare of Sexual Violence on the Border,” The New York Times supports Trump’s claims of violent crime on the border while showing the embarrassing fail of Jim Acosta’s “investigative” techniques.

From the NYT’s article:

President Trump has used the threat faced by migrant women to make his case for a border wall. “One in three women are sexually assaulted on the dangerous trek up through Mexico,” he said in January— an estimate that appears to have originated from some limited surveys, one of them by Doctors Without Borders, of women traveling through Mexico.

For weeks in that locked room, the men she had paid to get her safely to the United States drugged her with pills and cocaine, refusing to let her out even to bathe. “I think that since they put me in that room, they killed me,” she said. “They raped us so many times they didn’t see us as human beings anymore.”

On America’s southern border, migrant women and girls are the victims of sexual assaults that most often go unreported, uninvestigated and unprosecuted. Even as women around the world are speaking out against sexual misconduct, migrant women on the border live in the shadows of the #MeToo movement.

The stories are many, and yet all too similar. Undocumented women making their way into American border towns have been beaten for disobeying smugglers, impregnated by strangers, coerced into prostitution, shackled to beds and trees and — in at least a handful of cases — bound with duct tape, rope or handcuffs.

The New York Times found dozens of documented cases through interviews with law enforcement officials, prosecutors, federal judges and immigrant advocates around the country, and a review of police reports and court records in Texas, New Mexico, Arizona and California. The review showed more than 100 documented reports of sexual assault of undocumented women along the border in the past two decades, a number that most likely only skims the surface, law enforcement officials and advocates say.

They described a netherworld of fear that coexists with the bustling life of American cities up and down the border. One woman told of being held prisoner in a house that had been turned into a makeshift brothel in McAllen, a city of 143,000 in the Rio Grande Valley. “Nueva carne” — new meat, the smugglers said as she and other migrant women were led into the house, said the woman, Lucy, 45, a migrant from Honduras who, like others interviewed, did not want her last name used.

She said a series of men came into the house over the next several days and raped her. “Because I didn’t want to let them, they tied my feet together and my hands behind my back,” Lucy said.

Gladys, 45, a mother of four from Guatemala, said she was kidnapped by armed smugglers after crossing the border and jumped out of a car to escape, but was captured again. For days, she was held prisoner at a stash house in McAllen and forced to have sex with six men. “I thought it would be better if I died when I fell from the car,” she said.

Law enforcement officials on the border said they had made arrests in many of the cases brought to them and would pursue more if they could. But the majority of women who have been assaulted do not report it, often because their attackers threaten to expose their immigration status — or worse — if they do. One woman, raped repeatedly at gunpoint in a stash house in Phoenix in 2005, said her attacker threatened to sell her 3-year-old daughter if she reported him. Those who do go to the authorities may not know the names of their attackers, or even where the assault occurred. Smugglers make sure their clients are unsure of their whereabouts; if they are detained by their clients are unsure of their whereabouts; if they are detained by Border Patrol, they won’t be able to pinpoint where they were held.

The danger is real. Our media’s been hiding the truth for way too long.

 

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