Late last week, in Washington DC, Democrat congresswoman Nancy Pelosi (CA) (who was recently attacked by a large gang of “Dreamers” for not doing enough to help them gain amnesty), stood on the House floor for eight hours, yammering on about the  importance of giving almost 1 million illegal aliens and their families amnesty. Meanwhile, law enforcement officers in Boston were hard at work, trying to save millions of American lives, when they took down a dangerous Mexican drug gang, or “Nightmares”, with more than 33 pounds of fentanyl, enough to kill every resident living in the state of Massachusetts.

Fox News just announced that Boston authorities say they’ve seized more than 33 pounds of fentanyl—enough to kill millions of people—in connection with one of Massachusetts’ biggest drug busts ever.

How dangerous is 33 lbs of fentanyl? 

The opioid crisis just keeps getting worse, in part because new types of drugs keep finding their way onto the streets. Fentanyl, heroin’s synthetic cousin, is among the worst offenders.

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It’s deadly because it’s so much stronger than heroin, as shown by the photograph above, which was taken at the New Hampshire State Police Forensic Laboratory. On the left is a lethal dose of heroin, equivalent to about 30 milligrams; on the right is a 3-milligram dose of fentanyl, enough to kill an average-sized adult male.

Fentanyl, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is up to 100 times more potent than morphine and many times that of heroin.

Drugs users generally don’t know when their heroin is laced with fentanyl, so when they inject their usual quantity of heroin, they can inadvertently take a deadly dose of the substance. In addition, while dealers try to include fentanyl to improve potency, their measuring equipment usually isn’t fine-tuned enough to ensure they stay below the levels that could cause users to overdose. Plus, the fentanyl sold on the street is almost always made in a clandestine lab; it is less pure than the pharmaceutical version and thus its effect on the body can be more unpredictable.

Heroin and fentanyl look identical, and with drugs purchased on the street, “you don’t know what you’re taking,” Tim Pifer, the director of the New Hampshire State Police Forensic Laboratory, told STAT in an interview. “You’re injecting yourself with a loaded gun.”

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According to FOX News: In announcing the results of a six-month wiretap probe called “Operation High Hopes,” prosecutors said the synthetic opioid was being sold on the street by a drug gang with links to Mexico’s notorious Sinaloa Cartel, the drug organization once led by Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán.

The DA said 36 others were also arrested in the probe and that investigators also seized cocaine, heroin, two guns and $300,000 in cash.

“I want to be clear about the size and scope here,” District Attorney Daniel Conley said at a news conference Thursday. “Massachusetts’ fentanyl trafficking statute covers quantities greater than 10 grams. That threshold represents less than 1/1000 of the quantity we’ve taken off the street.”

He said the number of overdoses the seized fentanyl could have caused “is truly staggering.”

“Individuals who buy and sell at this level aren’t users,” Conley said. “They’re not small-time dealers, either. They’re certainly not selling to support a habit. They’re trafficking in addictive substances that claim more lives in Massachusetts than all homicides, all suicides, and all car crashes, statewide, combined.”

The Boston Herald quoted a law enforcement source as saying that the 33-plus pounds of fentanyl is enough to kill more than 7 million people in its raw form. Massachusetts population is 6.8 million.

Authorities said the biggest fish netted in the probe, conducted by Boston police and agents from the federal Drug Enforcement Agency, was Robert Contreras, 42, of Boston. He was arrested at his home Thursday and is being held in lieu of $1 million bail.

Conley said the probe’s initial focus was a Contreras customer, Edward Soto-Perez, 43, of Boston.

He said he took the “rare step of approving a wiretap” because Soto-Perez had been so adept at protecting the addresses of his stash houses and the identities of his suppliers.

Conley said the wiretap eventually led to Soto-Perez’s biggest supplier, Contreras, and established Contreras’ direct ties to the Sinaloa cartel.

 


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