A New York City waitress says she was FIRED from a popular Brooklyn restaurant after choosing not to get the COVID vaccine for fear it might hurt her chances of getting pregnant.

Bonnie Jacobson told The Post that the management at Red Hook Tavern canned her on Monday because she balked at getting the shot immediately.

“It was shocking to me,” she said Wednesday. “I went through the stages: I’m hurt, I’m in shock — then I got mad.”

Jacobson, who has been married since October 2019, stressed that she’s not an anti-vaxxer and “fully supports” people being inoculated, but said she wants to wait for more research on the coronavirus vaccine’s possible effects on fertility.

“The way I see it, getting the vaccine is for me. It protects me. If I am not getting it, it’s my choice, and I’d only be hurting myself,” she said.

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The coronavirus vaccines available haven’t been tested on pregnant women, but also haven’t been shown to affect pregnancy and are viewed as generally safe.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says that getting vaccinated is “a personal choice for people who are pregnant” and that expecting mothers can speak to their doctors about whether it’s right for them.

Restaurant staffers in New York joined the list of people eligible for the shot earlier this month.

Not long after, management at the buzzy Brooklyn eatery emailed staffers to let them know they were eligible, and later said the vaccine would be “MANDATORY” for all employees.

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The only exception to the policy would be, “If your own personal health or disability prohibits you from obtaining this vaccination,” read the Friday email, reviewed by The Post.

Jacobson — who began working at the restaurant in August after being let go from women’s co-working space ‘The Wing’ in the beginning of the pandemic — responded that she was “choosing not to get the vaccine because there just isn’t enough data or research at this point on its effects on fertility.”

“Once there is more research to support that it does not affect fertility I would reconsider my position,” she wrote.

But on Monday, after having worked a 13-hour shift on Valentine’s Day, Jacobson learned she was getting booted over her choice.

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