The incompetence of the government officials in the Democrat-run state of Hawaii is simply stunning…

On July 21, 2017, the Boston Herald interviewed the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency as part of a public education campaign about what residents should do in the event of an “unlikely” missile attack by North Korea.

In the archived article, they discussed how Hawaii will begin monthly tests of an “attack-warning” siren the state hasn’t heard since the end of the Cold War in the 1980s. The wailing siren will be tested on the first working day of each month, after a test of an “attention-alert” steady tone siren with which residents are already familiar.

Informational brochures, along with TV, radio and internet announcements will help educate the public about the new siren sound and provide preparedness guidance. “If they’re not educated, they could actually be frightened by it,” agency Executive Director Toby Clairmont said of needing several months to introduce the new siren.

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Because it would take a missile 15 minutes — maybe 20 minutes — to arrive, the instructions to the public are simple: “Get inside, stay inside and stay tuned,” said Vern Miyagi, agency administrator. “You will not have time to pick up your family and go to a shelter and all that kind of stuff. … It has to be automatic.”

He stressed that his agency is simply trying to stay ahead of a “very unlikely” scenario, but it’s a possibility that Hawaii can’t ignore.

GP pointed out the sticky notes with passwords that were stuck to the computer screens in photos published by the AP that were taken in the operations room.

The photo shows Hawaii Emergency Management Agency’s current operations officer, Jeffrey Wong, in front of computer screens monitoring hazards at the agency’s headquarters in Honolulu on Friday, July 21, 2017.

(AP Photo/Jennifer Sinco Kelleher)

The photo of  Wong showed computer screens inside the operations room. Wong and fellow operators obviously didn’t think to remove the passwords before the photos were taken and passwords were exposed to the public. The system password is “Password Warningpoint2”.

 

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