NYC prisons are releasing criminals because of the fear of spreading the coronavirus in prison. The problem is that the criminals are just committing more crimes after their release. A convicted murderer robbed a bank (see below) in NYC just two weeks ago, and now a rapist released has been arrested again for attempted rape and sexual assault.

The NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio is on record saying he’s surprised these criminals wouldn’t appreciate the mercy shown to them by releasing them from prison: “I think it’s unconscionable just on a human level that folks were shown mercy and this is what some of them have done.”  

RAPIST RELEASED…RAPES AGAIN:

A rapist just released from notorious Rikers Island prison on April 15th was just arrested for sexual assault and rape, according to The New York Post.

Police sources told the Post that Brooklyn resident Robert Pondexter, 57, was charged Saturday with attempted rape and sexual assault among other offenses:

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A 911 caller told police a man had been walking across the street from a supportive housing development when he allegedly grabbed a 58-year-old woman whom he did not know by the collar and pulled her into a school parking lot.

The woman told officers he forced her to perform oral sex and demanded that she remove her pants before she was able to kick away from him. She was transported to a local hospital.

VIOLENT CRIMINAL RELEASED…ROBS MANHATTAN BANK:

So while law-abiding Americans are told to stay inside, prisoners, including violent criminals, are allowed to go free.

The latest example below from the NYDN is one of several cases where the criminals are released but quickly end up back in jail:

James Little, a 41-year old with a violent criminal record, was recently freed on charges of assaulting his girlfriend over fears he might catch coronavirus in jail. His lawyers argued the NYC correction system is a coronavirus hotbed and won his release. His criminal history also included an arrest for murder in 1995. Little was 16 years old when he killed a man in Brooklyn on Jan. 11, 1995.

Little’s freedom didn’t last long because he was put back behind bars after he tried to rob a bank in Manhattan.

More examples below of criminals released have been sent back to prison:
A two-time felon released last month, Daniel Vargas, 29, was back behind bars after allegedly beating and robbing a Bronx man who walked with a cane.
Another freed suspect, career thief Darryl Naser, 25, was busted April 6 for allegedly breaking into a closed newsstand on W. 34th St. Naser was released Wednesday morning without bail. He was arrested again Wednesday night on drug charges.

It’s now come to releasing prisoners to “home confinement”:

Politico is reporting that the “virus-wracked federal prisons again expand release criteria,” including “home confinement for inmates.”
The new policy allows home confinement for inmates who’ve yet to serve half their sentence. The federal prison system has quietly broadened the ranks of inmates eligible to be transferred into home confinement as officials seek to limit the continuing spread of the novel coronavirus behind bars.
The latest move by the Bureau of Prisons allows inmates who have yet to complete half of their sentences to be considered for the early release program.

If prisons are releasing prisoners and allowing them to stay home, how is there any deterrent for criminals to commit more crimes?

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