Earlier today, President Trump called out con-man Sharpton, who announced he was on his way to Baltimore to save the day after Trump called out Dem. Rep. Elijah Cummings, telling him to clean up his “rat and rodent-infested” district before trashing US Border agents for the condition of the overflowing detention centers.

Trump tweeted:

I have known Al for 25 years. Went to fights with him & Don King, always got along well. He “loved Trump!” He would ask me for favors often. Al is a con man, a troublemaker, always looking for a score. Just doing his thing. Must have intimidated Comcast/NBC. Hates Whites & Cops!

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So, how do Black Americans living in Rep. Elijah Cummings rat and rodent-infested district feel about the “Reverend” Al Sharpton?

In January 2017, Black activists confronted race pimp, Al Sharpton, as he came to “preach” in Baltimore.

Duane Davis aka “Shorty” called out the Obama bestie, Al Sharpton, and gave him an earful from Shorty over his phony rhetoric about helping Black Americans.

Sharpton was confronted by the Black “300 Gangsters’ activists as he exited his vehicle with body guards.  The group’s leader, Shorty, asked Sharpton he was in Baltimore? The conman told the activists he was there to “preach.” When they asked how much he was being paid to preach, Sharpton’s thugs started to get physical with the activists, as they can be heard telling them to “get your hands off me!” When Sharpton was asked again how much he was getting paid to preach, he refused to answer.

When Shorty asked him what he’s doing about the incarceration rate of Black Americans, Sharpton quickly shot back that he “just got five guys commuted.” Shorty and his group of activists can be heard laughing. One of the members of his Shorty’s group reminds Sharpton that there are more than 200,000 black males who are incarcerated, telling the con-man that he’s gotten double Sharpton’s number of sentences commuted, “I got ten of em out,” he tells Sharpton. “Five men is not acceptable in our community!” Shorty tells Sharpton.

Sharpton, who appears to be embarrassed by the activists who’ve caught him red-handed doing nothing for the Black community he’s about to be paid to preach to, tells the activists, “But I’m not acting in Baltimore, you are.” “That’s the problem,” they tell him. Sharpton responds, “But I’m not trying to operate in Baltimore.”

Shorty explains to Sharpton that when something happens with the police in Baltimore that he “jumps on their ass first.” Shorty tells Sharpton that he needs his help to get him out of jail when he “f*cks the police up for jumping on someone.” Watch, how the “Reverend” Al Sharpton doesn’t bat an eye, agreeing to pay Shorty’s bail for “f*cking up” the police.

The 300 Gangsters members continue to bash Sharpton, as one of them accuses him of shaking the hand of Donald Trump. Sharpton quickly tries to cover up his love for the former billionaire businessman, Donald Trump, by saying, “I didn’t shake hands with Donald Trump!” One of the activists tells Sharpton he’s got a picture of Sharpton shaking hands with Trump. Sharpton shot back, that Trump just happened to be at the same Mike Tyson fight.

Watch: ***LANGUAGE ALERT***

For anyone who’s not paying attention, President Trump has done more to help incarcerated minorities than any president or shake-down artist, in the history of the United States. On December 21, 2018, President Trump signed the bipartisan “First Step Act” into law, that he passionately pushed Congress to pass.

“This legislation reformed sentencing laws that have wrongly and disproportionately harmed the African-American community,” Trump explained on Feb. 5. “The First Step Act gives nonviolent offenders the chance to reenter society as productive, law-abiding citizens. Now, states across the country are following our lead. America is a nation that believes in redemption.

The First Step Act – or the Formerly Incarcerated Reenter Society Transformed Safely Transitioning Every Person Act – is, at its core, a directive for the Justice Department to establish a system to assess the risk of a person to re-offend as well as to create housing or other incentives for offenders to participate in recidivism reduction programs.

The bill, which passed the Senate 87-12, culminates years of negotiations and GAVE the Trump administration a signature policy victory. It’s been heralded by conservatives and liberals, celebrities and Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law, who worked the halls of Congress for months to forge a compromise.

Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., heralded the bill as a start to righting the country’s “broken” criminal justice system.

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