Overpriced coffee lovers across America attempted to get their Starbucks fix last week but quickly found out that the popular coffee chain was shut down for the day for “anti-bias” training. It was Corporate Starbucks attempt to right the reported “wrong” of a barista in Philadelphia who asked two black customers she believed were loitering in the store to leave. The two black men claimed they were waiting for a friend to join them. After several requests for them to leave, the barista called the police and the two men were arrested. Instead of dealing directly with the barista in question, Starbucks cast a net of suspicion over every white employee and shut down 8,000 stores for the day to fix their undercover bias’. 

All eyes were on Starbucks again on Tuesday as the corporation shut down 8,000 stores to conduct anti-bias training following the public uproar over a white Starbucks manager calling the police on two black men who were waiting in a store in Philadelphia in April.

Starbucks billed Tuesday’s training as “one step” in addressing racial bias, and national reports have called the company’s move an “important start.” But for two Philadelphia Starbucks employees I talked to, the training merely “targeted” people of color and exacerbated racial tensions.

Not everyone working for Starbucks was exactly thrilled with the “anti-bias” training they were forced to undergo…

“At one point a girl at my table actually had to get up and leave because video after video they showed black people being assaulted by police or black people being verbally assaulted and white people being racially biased toward people of color,” a young black female Starbucks employee told Philly Mag after being forced to take part in their “racial sensitivity” training course this week.

“The videos of cops knocking people down and fighting people were really disturbing,” Tina explained. “I told them I didn’t like the video and they told me they understood and that I was open to give my opinion.” What does watching videos about police brutality have to do with the situation that happened, Tina said she kept asking herself. “They went too deep into it and missed the point all at the same time.”

“At one point,” said Jamie, “a girl at my table actually had to get up and leave because video after video they showed black people being assaulted by police or black people being verbally assaulted and white people being racially biased toward people of color. It offended her. She left after that.”

Here’s one of the videos that Starbucks showed to their employees. The video presents the civil rights era, as it attempts to prove nothing has changed since the 60’s in America when it comes to racism. 

The Training Felt More Like an African-American History Class.

“We got too deep into black history and got past what I thought was the point of the session,” Tina said, pointing out that one of the videos they watched went back to lunch-counter sit-ins of the 1960s. –Philly Mag

Info Wars interviewed a Starbucks manager and whistleblower. In the video, the manager talks about how the training was exclusively aimed at white people and their treatment of blacks. Alex Jones does a brilliant job of exposing the George Soros groups behind Starbuck’s mandatory “anti-bias” training, and exposing the division the training actually caused:

[…]As Starbucks previously announced, the training videos featured the rapper Common, but it was unclear to the baristas why he was included. “It made it seem like they were pandering to us as a people, which is rude,” said Jamie. “What does Common know about anything that we’re going through? What does he have to do with anything?”

 


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