The drama llama just pulled up and dropped off a demanding cease and desist to President Donald Trump that demands him to stop playing Aerosmith songs during his rallies. Steven Tyler seems to be upset that his song “Livin’ on the Edge” was playing during his recent rally in West Virginia, and he must not want his music associated with the Trump presidency.

This is at least the third time that Steven Tyler has gotten upset about Trump playing his music, although there might not be anything that Tyler can actually do about it. Trump was using the song “Dream On” during his campaign in which Tyler twice asked him to stop playing their music. Just recently Trump had “Livin’ on the Edge” playing at a rally.

Tyler must be fuming, but he might become more irritable if he finds out there’s nothing that he can do to stop Trump from playing his music if Trump has indeed acquired the legal rights to play the songs.

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Trump claims he did, so he might have to send Tyler a reminder that maybe he should dream on.

Jim Acosta (yeah, that guy) showed some coverage of the song “Livin’ on the Edge” playing.

After facing tons of differentiated comments on social media and comment sections of blogs – some supportive, but many bashing him for whining about it, the famous rocker went on Twitter to state his feelings on the issue.

Steven Tyler posted on Twitter: “THIS IS NOT ABOUT DEMS VS. REPUB. I DO NOT LET ANYONE USE MY SONGS WITHOUT MY PERMISSION. MY MUSIC IS FOR CAUSES NOT FOR POLITICAL CAMPAIGNS OR RALLIES. PROTECTING COPYRIGHT AND SONGWRITERS IS WHAT I’VE BEEN FIGHTING FOR EVEN BEFORE THIS CURRENT ADMINISTRATION TOOK OFFICE.”

While Steven Tyler can send a cease and desist letter to President Trump, there’s just one thing about this that he didn’t quite mention. Trump claims to have paid for the rights to use the songs during his rallies. If Trump has paid for the rights to use the songs and did everything the legal way through the music industry, then there might not be anything that Steven Tyler can do about it. Tyler might have to suck it up, buttercup. Why didn’t Steven mention that part?

This might become a very small legal case that would simply require people to read the rules on the rights to use music, and if Trump played by the rules, then Steven Tyler might be going back up in that elevator with a dude who looks like a lady.

AOL stated: “In Tyler’s cease-and-desist letter, obtained by CBS News, his legal team says that Trump is “creating the impression that our client has given his consent for the use of his music, and even that he endorses the presidency of Mr. Trump.” The letter says that according to the Lanham Act, Trump requires Tyler’s written permission to use his music.

Tyler weighed in on Twitter, saying it wasn’t personal. “I do not let anyone use my songs without my permission,” he wrote. “My music is for causes not for political campaigns or rallies.”

The rocker continued, noting that he’s been fighting to protect copyright and songwriters for years, before Trump took office. “This is one of the reasons why @JoePerry and I have been pushing the senate to pass the Music Modernization Act,” he said.

Artists like Adele, the Rolling Stones and Neil Young have all previously objected to Trump using their songs at his rallies, though political campaigns don’t need musicians’ permission to use their songs at events, as long as they obtain a blanket license under performing rights organizations like ASCAP or BMI.

Trump, meanwhile, has insisted that he does have the rights to use the songs he plays at rallies. “You know, we use so many songs,” he told CNBC in 2016. “We have the rights to use them. I always buy the rights.”

Now what? If Trump paid for the rights, then what can Tyler do besides complain?
Is it just me, or has Trump blasted the music to thousands of people who were having fun and might have given Aerosmith a little bit of extra publicity?

Should Steven Tyler be thanking Trump for keeping the band relevant after all these years?

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