A new study claims COVID-19 jab mRNA can spread to the placenta and umbilical cord blood.

“Our findings suggest that the vaccine mRNA is not localized to the injection site and can spread systemically to the placenta and umbilical cord blood. The detection of the spike protein in the placental tissue indicates the bioactivity of the vaccine mRNA reaching the placenta,” the authors of the journal pre-proof wrote.

“Notably, the vaccine mRNA was largely fragmented in the cord blood and, to a lesser extent, in the placenta. To our knowledge, these two cases demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of the COVID-19 vaccine mRNA to penetrate the fetal-placental barrier and reach the intrauterine environment,” the conclusion read.

The study, titled ‘Transplacental Transmission of the COVID-19 Vaccine mRNA: Evidence from Placental, Maternal and Cord Blood Analyses Post-Vaccination’, was published February 1st in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

“Spike mRNA and protein found in placentas,” Medicinal Genomics founder Kevin McKernan said.

“The real question is why would a mother wait to take a vax 10 days before vBirth and 2 days before C-section Sounds like they waited until the last minute to vaccinate… Almost as if the hospital wouldn’t let them give birth there without it?” he wrote.

Chief Nerd shared findings from the study:

“This study aimed to assess the presence of COVID-19 vaccine mRNA in the placenta and cord blood following maternal vaccination during human pregnancy.

The vaccine mRNA was detected in the two placentas tested using quantitative ddPCR and ISH. The localization of the vaccine mRNA was mainly in the villus stroma (panels Ab and Ad), with a notably high signal in the decidua of patient 1 (panel Aa) compared to that of patient 2 (Panel Ac).

Furthermore, the vaccine mRNA was detected in the cord and maternal blood of patient #1 using ddPCR. Unfortunately, no umbilical cord or maternal blood samples were available for analysis in patient #2.

Our findings suggest that the vaccine mRNA is not localized to the injection site and can spread systemically to the placenta and umbilical cord blood. The detection of the spike protein in the placental tissue indicates the bioactivity of the vaccine mRNA reaching the placenta. Notably, the vaccine mRNA was largely fragmented in the cord blood and, to a lesser extent, in the placenta.

To our knowledge, these two cases demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of the COVID-19 vaccine mRNA to penetrate the fetal-placental barrier and reach the intrauterine environment.”

“Never forget that politicians and medics all over the world coerced people to get these gene therapy shots and told them they were ‘localized vaccines’ that would stay in the upper arm. What we ‘conspiracy theorists’ feared now seems to be confirmed: you pass it onto your baby,” Eva Vlaardingerbroek wrote.

“If you claim to be pro-life this is a bigger issue than abortion because they are shoved on people as if its a cure when in fact its a poison. At least with abortion, everyone knows what it is,” The Blaze Senior Editor Daniel Horowitz commented.

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“Why wouldn’t they conduct animal reproductive trials before green lighting this for the population, especially those who are pregnant?!” Dr. Craig Wax questioned.

“Spike mRNA and proteins have been found in female placentas. (also found in high concentrations in male testes) This is extremely alarming, and probably explains the sharp rise in COVID vaccine-related miscarriages over the past three years,” Sovereign Brah writes.

From the study’s conclusions:

Two previous human studies by the same research group investigated the presence of COVID vaccine mRNA in the placenta, but with different methodologies and results. The first study, using qRT-PCR, failed to detect mRNA in maternal blood, cord blood, or placental tissue, possibly due to the long interval between vaccination and delivery and the use of a single primer set not fully aligned with the mRNA-1273 vaccine. In their subsequent study to improve the sensitivity of the detection, an RNAscope-based ISH assay was used, which also did not detect the vaccine mRNA. However, the probe used targeted the SARS-CoV-2 S gene rather than the vaccine mRNA sequence. This can lead to inaccurate results due to the mismatch between the probe and the target sequence. In our study, we adopted a more sensitive and robust approach. We used two primer sets covering ~1.5 kb of the full-length mRNA vaccine to enhance detection sensitivity. Furthermore, we utilized ddPCR for more precise quantification of the vaccine mRNA, offering superior accuracy and sensitivity over RT-qPCR. Lastly, our RNAscope-based ISH assay used a probe tailored explicitly for the vaccine mRNA, thus ensuring more reliable detection.

In this report, the placental concentration of the vaccine mRNA was higher in patient #1 (delivered 2 days after vaccination) than in patient #2 (delivered 10 days after vaccination). This observation is likely attributable to the short half-life of the vaccine mRNA, leading to rapid degradation by day 10 post-vaccination. Conversely, the expression of the spike protein in the placenta of patient #2, but not in patient #1, suggests that more than two days are required post-vaccination for the mRNA to reach the placenta and be translated into the spike protein, which is then expressed in the placental tissue. Notably, a significant amount of the vaccine mRNA in patient #1’s maternal blood was also detected in the cord blood (Table 1, approximately one-third). However, the vaccine mRNA integrity was significantly reduced to 13%. While the vaccine mRNA in cord blood seems fragmented, suggesting limited bioactivity, further investigation is required to determine the minimum amount of mRNA required to elicit an immune response in the fetus. Although our findings are novel, they represent only two cases, and validation through subsequent research is needed. Furthermore, the specific mechanisms and contributing factors that facilitate the transplacental transport of vaccine mRNA need further exploration.

The evidence overwhelmingly supports the COVID-19 vaccine’s effectiveness in mitigating the morbidity and mortality related to the COVID-19 disease in pregnant and non-pregnant individuals. The widespread acceptance and proven safety of mRNA vaccines during the COVID 19 pandemic have opened doors for other mRNA therapies. While gene therapy, particularly mRNA-based treatments, shows promise, research on its perinatal delivery is still emerging. Prenatal therapy can be advantageous, as it offers early disease intervention and reduced immunogenicity. In experiments with pregnant rats, LNPs successfully delivered various mRNAs, including one potentially useful for treating fetal anemia. Although introducing mRNA to the fetus may pose potentially plausible risks, it may also have biologically plausible benefits. The potential of mRNA-based interventions in addressing maternal and fetal health issues is profound. Such insights could substantially advance the crafting of safer and more effective mRNA-based therapies during pregnancy.

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