As recently as April 12, 2020, the Islamic Republic of Iran publicly hanged a 31-year-old Iranian man after he was found guilty of charges related to violations of Iran’s anti-gay laws.

The unidentified man was hanged on January 10 in the southwestern city of Kazeroon based on criminal violations of sexual intercourse between two men, as well as kidnapping charges, according to ISNA. Iran’s radical sharia law system prescribes the death penalty for gay sex.

In 2005, two teenagers were publicly hanged in Iran alongside an adult male after they were accused of being gay.

The three men were hanged in Iran for the crime of lavat, sexual intercourse between two men. The case is considered extreme even by Iranian standards because while the death penalty is in place for homosexuality, it is usually enforced only when there is a charge of assault or rape alongside it; the accusations in these three cases were of consensual sex.

On May 17, 2021, Amnesty International reported on a disturbing incident involving the fatal punishment of an Iranian male for the “crime” of being gay.

Friends of Alireza Fazeli Monfared, who identified as a non-binary gay man, told Amnesty International that he was abducted by several male relatives in his hometown of Ahvaz, Khuzestan province, on 4 May 2021. The next day the relatives informed his mother that they had killed him and dumped his body under a tree. Authorities confirmed that Alireza Fazeli Monfared’s throat was slit and announced investigations, but none of the suspected perpetrators have been arrested to date.

Alireza Fazeli Monfared,

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“Alireza Fazeli Monfared’s brutal murder exposes the deadly consequences of state fuelled homophobia and is a tragic reminder of the urgent need to repeal laws that criminalize consensual same-sex relations and gender non-conformity. ” – Diana Eltahawy, Amnesty International.

Yesterday, during a press conference with the US Men’s Soccer team coach and player, Tyler Adams, an Iranian “journalist” ambushed them to blast them for the mispronunciation of “Iran,” adding, “Please, once and for all, get this right!” he said. The so-called “journalist” then hilariously asked Adams if he was ashamed to be representing the United States, which the “journalist” referred to as a country that “discriminates” against minorities.

The US coach jumped in to change the subject, saying that for the US team, “it’s about focus,” adding that the US men’s soccer team is only focused on beating Iran in their upcoming match.

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The anti-gay, anti-free speech, anti-woman Iran should get their own house in order before they hilariously attempt to criticize the freest nation on earth for “discrimination.

On Thursday, the New York Post reported about a prominent former Iranian soccer player who was arrested over his criticism of the government as authorities grapple with nationwide protests that have cast a shadow over its competition at the World Cup.

The semi-official Fars and Tasnim news agencies reported that Voria Ghafouri was arrested for “insulting the national soccer team and propagandizing against the government.”

Ghafouri, who was not chosen to go to the World Cup, has been an outspoken critic of Iranian authorities throughout his career. He objected to a longstanding ban on women spectators at men’s soccer matches as well as Iran’s confrontational foreign policy, which has led to crippling Western sanctions.

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