Michigan Rep. Peter Meijer (R) is fighting to remain in Congress beyond his freshman term. Meijer is one of 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach President Donald Trump. Meijer was already facing a brutal primary on Tuesday — and now Democrats are trying to twist the knife a little more in the final days of his primary.

Just three days after Meijer was sworn into the 117th Congress as a freshman legislator, he cast his vote to impeach President Trump after the U.S. Capitol incident on January 6, 2021.

Meijer’s surname is familiar in Michigan because of his family’s national supercenter chain based in Michigan. Meijer will face John Gibbs in the state’s 3rd Congressional District primary on Tuesday, August 2.

Meijer is locked in a battle for survival with John Gibbs, a former Trump administration official who received an endorsement from President Trump. Gibbs was a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) official during the Trump administration. President Trump appointed Gibbs to lead the Office of Personnel Management, but the U.S. Senate did not confirm Gibbs.

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That alone would make it an exciting race. However, the added element of redistricting elevates this to one of the most closely watched elections nationwide as Republicans strive to regain control of the U.S. House and Democrats try to flip the seat.

Michigan’s newly drawn redistricting adds to the exciting race between Meijer and Gibbs as Republicans hope to regain control of the U.S. House and Democrats strive to flip the seat. Michigan’s political districts saw little change for decades when state legislators handled them.

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The district has not seen a Democratic congressional member since 1993. Still, with the new map, organizations like the Cook Political Report, Inside Elections, and Sabato’s Crystal Ball rate the general election as a toss-up.

Meijer is now blasting Dems for spending money to boost his primary challenger. 

Oddly, Democratic-aligned groups are playing games by trying to boost Republican candidates.

Why? Most likely, it’s because they believe those candidates will be easier to defeat in the upcoming general election.

Meijer is just the latest target of such efforts. This move certainly highlights the hypocrisy among liberals.

After making the controversial decision to vote to impeach President Donald Trump, Independent Journal Review reported that Meijer has been rewarded by facing Democratic cash to boost a primary opponent.

The efforts by Democratic groups to boost Republican candidates who have questioned the 2020 election results have been well documented by The Washington Post.

 

Politico reported

On Monday morning, the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee placed a TV ad in the Grand Rapids market to meddle in the final days of Meijer’s (R-Mich.) primary. The Western Michigan district is one of the party’s top offensive targets this election, and Democratic strategists believe if they can boost Meijer’s pro-Trump challenger to victory, they will have an easier time this fall trying to flip a seat President Joe Biden carried by nine points in 2020.

The 30-second ad warns Gibbs is “too conservative” for West Michigan and that he was “handpicked by Trump to run for Congress.” It also notes that he worked for Ben Carson, Trump’s Housing and Urban Development secretary.

The spot will raise Gibbs’ name recognition in the district since his campaign has not been able to air its own TV ads. In addition, the ad is aimed at GOP primary voters who could be persuaded to vote for Gibbs by his Trump ties.

Watch the ad:

In a post on Bari Weiss’ Substack, the Congressman wrote, “Tomorrow I’m facing off against John Gibbs in the Republican primary for Michigan’s Third Congressional District. The race is close. Internal polling has us within single digits of one another. But Gibbs and I couldn’t be more different.”

“I am a staunch defender of the Constitution and the rule of law. Accordingly, I became the first incoming freshman to recognize former Vice President Biden’s presidential victory. Then, three days after I was sworn into office in January 2021, I was in the House chamber when rioters overran the Capitol. A week later, I joined nine other Republicans, including Liz Cheney, to impeach then-President Donald Trump with a heavy but resolute conscience,” he continued. “I am the only freshman in history to impeach a president of his own party.”

He also pointed out that John Gibbs, his primary challenger, has rejected the 2020 election results and has “defended antisemites on his now-locked Twitter account.”

After pointing out that Democratic party leaders claim “we are in an existential conflict between defenders of democracy and advocates of authoritarianism,” Meijer wrote, “You would think that the Democrats would look at John Gibbs and see the embodiment of what they say they most fear. That as patriots, they would use every tool at their disposal to defeat him and similar candidates that they’ve said are an existential threat.”

“Instead, they are funding Gibbs,” he added.

Additionally, he noted that the $435,000 ad buy from the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) was “more than Gibbs raised over the entire duration of his campaign. It was also nearly 100x the support Donald Trump himself offered to Gibbs.”

Gibbs grew up in the Lansing area.   He moved to west Michigan last year.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in computer science from Stanford University and a master’s degree in public administration from Harvard University. He served as a missionary in Japan and worked in Silicon Valley as a software engineer before his role with the housing department.

The vote to impeach President Trump –

Three days after Meijer was sworn into the 117th Congress as a freshman legislator, he cast his vote to impeach Trump after the U.S. Capitol breach on January 6, 2021.

“I’ll be honest, this is something I agonized over,” Meijer told NPR about the decision. “You know, I read the articles, and they were appropriate. They were what we experienced and what happened. I had to vote ‘yes’ and support that impeachment.”

As previously reported by 100% FED UP,

Freshman Representative Peter Meijer said on January 17 that joining nine House Republicans in voting to impeach President Trump may have ended his political future.

In an interview on ABC News “This Week,” Meijer, a first-term Republican, told host George Stephanopoulos said he doesn’t regret it.

“I may very well have [ended my career], but I think it’s also important that we have elected leaders who are not thinking solely about what’s in their individual self-interest, not what is going to be politically expedient, but what we actually need for our country,” Meijer said.

As previously reported by 100% FED UP,

Meijer told WOOD-TV:

What we saw on that day, especially between noon and 4:17 p.m., when the president put out his tweet, gently telling people there to go home but also saying we love you, you’re special – To me, that was disqualifying. He said that while we were in rooms lowering the blinds. [We] didn’t know which parts of the Capitol complex were secure. [We] didn’t know the extent of what might have happened. [We] didn’t know whether members of Congress were among those killed or injured. So to me, that again just disqualifies.

WATCH:

Meijer or Gibbs will meet Democrat Hillary Scholten in November’s general election in a newly drawn 3rd District that once favored Republicans but is now friendlier to Democrats.

In the past, Meijer embraced his role as a Trump antagonist through media interviews and social media posts. In recent weeks, however, he has mostly remained quiet about the impeachment decisions.

Some Michiganders may have liked the opportunity to contribute to the ads in order to help show Peter Meijer the door.

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