NBC reporter Jacob Soboroff went to the University of California-Irvine campus and got a huge surprise when he asked a question about voting. He pushed the idea to students that the huge student body of 26 thousand could flip a local Republican House district to the Democrats if they voted. Oops, he didn’t count on the students at the bus stop to be clueless and uninterested in voting…

Soboroff asked: “Sorry, not to be annoying, but we’re with NBC News … Is anyone here going to vote in the election on November 6?…Anybody? Anybody? Nobody’s going to vote?”

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The students responded with blank stares and disinterest. Students said they care about how expensive college is and then one said he doesn’t follow the news. One student admitted he wasn’t registered to vote!

Even though Soboroff pushed the students by saying they could flip a Republican district, they remained uninterested.
HuffPo reports:
Millennials (aged 18 to 35) now make up 31% of the voting-eligible population. Yet, in 2016, young voters continued the time-worn trend of not showing up to the polls, having only 50% of youth, aged 18 to 29, show up to cast a ballot in November. An analysis of voter turnout in presidential elections shows that this is not a recent trend, and time-and-again, the 18 to 24 age group show up to the polls less than all other age groups.
Theories of apathy are the main reason given for low young voter turnout. The left claims that there has been an effort to make it hard for our youth to vote. We disagree wholeheartedly with that theory. Voter Registration tables are as common as keg parties at colleges across America.

 


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