Yesterday, during Judge Kavanaugh’s nomination hearings, the actor/US Senator Corey Booker threatened to release emails that he suggested would be damning to Kavanaugh’s chances of being nominated as our next US Supreme Court Justice. When Senator John Cornyn warned the 2020 Democrat presidential hopeful, Corey Booker against releasing the emails, explaining that he could be removed from his office for violating committee rules, Booker demanded that it was worth the risk, referring to himself a “Spartacus”. Shortly afterward, Booker released the emails he threatened Judge Kavanaugh with on Twitter.

In dramatic fashion, Booker demanded that he was prepared to break the rules anyhow, and risk losing his position as a US Senator: “I am, right now, before your process is finished — I am going to release the email about racial profiling. I understand that the penalty comes with potential ousting from the Senate.”

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Watch the dramatic exchange here:

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The fury over the documents led to a letdown for Democrats. The documents only demonstrated that in 2002, soon after the 9/11 attacks, Kavanaugh was against the racial profiling of people while working for the Bush White House. Kavanaugh told colleagues in the email that he favors “effective security measures that are race-neutral” for airports, and he is against “race-based” remedies for law enforcement in the aftermath of the attack.

After the emails were released, it was discovered the emails had actually been cleared to be released to the public and that Senator Booker was aware of the green light he was given to release the emails, yet he continued with his grandstanding for the cameras, likely for the purpose of creating dramatic campaign footage. Senator Booker not only disrespected Judge Kavanaugh with his dramatic behavior, he also disrespected the entire nomination process, turning it into a two-bit, self-promotional carnival act.

Today, CNN’s Andersen Cooper confronted Corey Booker about the emails that he had been given permission to release the night before the hearings. Booker knew he was caught lying, yet he refused to admit that he manufactured the entire scene to promote himself as a defender of the left.

Watch:

This isn’t the first time the Democrat presidential hopeful, Senator Booker was caught shamefully lying to promote his political career…

The National Review reported about the incredible string of lies told by Corey Booker, about his imaginary friend, “T-Bone” while running for Mayor in Newark, New Jersey.

Sit back and listen to Cory Booker’s stump speeches over the years, and, as in those of any politician, you’ll hear many of the same stories. But Booker’s are more dramatic and heart-rending than most. They draw heavily on his experiences in Newark, N.J., where he moved in 1995 after his second year at Yale Law School. They have also helped to make him a political celebrity and put millions of dollars into his campaign war chest and Newark’s coffers.

Booker’s tales of his trials and travails on the streets of Newark, the city that twice elected him mayor, are familiar, and they have helped to breed an almost mythological aura around the Stanford, Oxford, and Yale graduate. He did, after all, rescue a woman from a burning building last year, sustaining burns in the process. But sources tell National Review Online that the central character in one of Booker’s oft-repeated stories — T-Bone, the drug pusher who the mayor has said threatened his life at one turn and sobbed on his shoulder the next — is a figment of his imagination, even though Booker has talked about him in highly emotional terms and in great detail.

The Newark mayor invented a street character for dramatic effect.

Go back and listen to Cory Booker’s stump speeches over the years, and, as in those of any politician, you’ll hear many of the same stories. But Booker’s are more dramatic and heart-rending than most. They draw heavily on his experiences in Newark, N.J., where he moved in 1995 after his second year at Yale Law School. They have also helped to make him a political celebrity and put millions of dollars into his campaign war chest and Newark’s coffers.

Watch Corey Booker tell lie, after dramatic lie about his made-up friend, “T-Bone” for several minutes in front of a crowd, without batting an eye.:

Booker’s tales of his trials and travails on the streets of Newark, the city that twice elected him mayor, are familiar, and they have helped to breed an almost mythological aura around the Stanford, Oxford, and Yale graduate. He did, after all, rescue a woman from a burning building last year, sustaining burns in the process. But sources tell National Review Online that the central character in one of Booker’s oft-repeated stories — T-Bone, the drug pusher who the mayor has said threatened his life at one turn and sobbed on his shoulder the next — is a figment of his imagination, even though Booker has talked about him in highly emotional terms and in great detail.

The tale is one Booker admits he’s told “a million” times, according to the Newark Star-Ledger. Ronald Rice Jr., a Newark city councilman and Booker ally who has known the mayor since 1998, says the T-Bone story was “a fixture” of Booker’s unsuccessful 2002 mayoral bid against corrupt Newark political boss Sharpe James, perhaps for its symbolic value. In Booker’s mind, according to the city councilman, “It’s not so much the details of the story” that matter, but the principle that “these things happen, they happen to real people, they happen in the city of Newark.” Rice, a Newark native, says he doesn’t know whether T-Bone exists. But, he explains, “if Cory had to tell a story or two and mix details up for Newark to get the funding for it, I see that as something that’s taking tragedy and doing something productive for it.”

The T-Bone tale never sat right with Rutgers University history professor Clement Price, a Booker supporter who tells National Review Online he found the mayor’s story offensive because it “pandered to a stereotype of inner-city black men.” T-Bone, Price says, “is a southern-inflected name. You would expect to run into something or somebody named T-Bone in Memphis, not Newark.”

#ad#Price considers himself a mentor and friend to Booker and says Booker conceded to him in 2008 that T-Bone was a “composite” of several people he’d met while living in Newark. The professor describes a “tough conversation” in which he told Booker “that I disapproved of his inventing such a person.” “If you’re going to create a composite of a man along High Street,” he says he asked Booker, “why don’t you make it W. E. B. DuBois?” From Booker, he says, “There was no pushback. He agreed that was a mistake.” Since then, references to T-Bone have been conspicuously absent from Booker’s speeches.

After being outed for lying, Corey Booker doubles down on his lie, after the interviewer in the clip below actually offers to give him a way out of his lies. Watch Booker say “T-Bone” isn’t a composite of characters or even a made-up friend. To prove his point that he’s down with the stereotypical black, inner-city man who’s addicted to drugs, Booker takes a step further and says he even let drug dealers live in his house. Yeah—okay, Corey.


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