14-year-old Aiden Ekanayake was allegedly “excited” to get the COVID jab on May 12, 2021, the first day it became available to children his age. Aiden’s mom, Emily Jo, was also excited for her son, who was in an age group of individuals at low risk of dying from COVID, to receive the experimental mRNA jab.

Emily Jo was actually so proud of her decision to have her 14-yr-old son vaccinated that she took a photo of him in their vehicle on the way home from getting jabbed with a proof of vaccination card in his hand.

Here is the image that Twitter doesn’t show of Aiden holding his proof of vaccination card that is about as useful now as a mood ring:

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Emily Jo Ekanayake bragged on social media about vaccinating all three of her young children only four days before her 14-yr-old son received his first COVID jab.

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As it turns out, Aiden was one of the unlucky kids in his age group who suffered myocarditis, a serious side effect, after receiving his second dose of the Pfizer COVID vaccine. One month after bragging about her son’s vaccination, Aiden’s mom took to Twitter to express her outrage over the “hospital bills and endless cardiology follow-ups because he got post-vaccine myocarditis.”

The vaccines may have been free—but the treatment for vaccine injuries is not.

National Geographic reports – From the start, 14-year-old Aiden Ekanayake and his mom Emily didn’t question whether Aiden would get a COVID-19 vaccine. “We take COVID extremely seriously, so our plan has always been to vaccinate,” Emily says. Aiden was “pretty excited for it” because it meant doing more activities and worrying less about getting sick. And though Emily had heard about possible side effects, she knew they were usually mild.

Aiden got his first dose of the Pfizer mRNA vaccine on May 12, 2021, the day it became available for people his age. Four weeks later, he got his second dose. The very next day, Aiden began feeling mild chest pain. He dismissed it, assuming it was related to his asthma, but the pain kept waking him up that night.

“I began to get frightened because I was able to fall back asleep and then woke up an hour later with the same pain,” Aiden says. He woke his mother at dawn, and Emily recognized the signs of myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart known to occur in rare cases after the Pfizer vaccine.

Aiden spent four days in the acute cardiac unit at their local hospital, where he was given anti-inflammatory drugs for the pain. After discharge, Aiden discovered that any activity that raised his heart rate could still trigger mild chest pain. Though he’s expected to recover fully, his parents are watching the medical bills roll in, despite their insurance coverage. “We did everything we were told to do, and we shouldn’t be paying the price in more than one way,” Emily says. “It’s adding insult to injury.”

Following her son’s nightmare medical experience, Emily Jo decided to hold off on vaccinating Aiden’s two siblings.

Aiden’s “pro-vaccination” mom, who was excited for her son to get the COVID jab on the first day it became available for him, appeared on Fox News’ Tucker Carlson show, where she explained to the top-rated host how strangers have reacted to her revealing the truth about what happened to her son on social media. “It’s been life-altering” and “eye-opening” to experience being called a “liar” for telling the truth, Emily Jo Ekanayake said about her efforts to reveal what happened to her son following his second Pfizer COVID jab.

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Aiden’s mom, who makes no secret about the fact that she’s a liberal, is fighting back against both liberals who mock her for telling the truth about the adverse effect the COVID jab had on her son and conservatives who mock her for giving her son the experimental jab on the first day it became available.

In one tweet from Emily Jo, she pushes back on the “if it saves one life crowd,” who pushed the vaccine on the masses as part of a scheme for the “greater good” while accepting the “hearts of young males as collateral damage.”

Emily Jo and her husband are now stuck with exorbitant hospital bills and have discovered they have few to no options when it comes to paying the expenses they’ve incurred over their son’s vaccine injury.

In their headline about the struggles families and individuals are facing to pay the enormous medical bills associated with COVID vaccine injuries,  National Geographic asks: “Why is it so hard to compensate people for serious vaccine side effects?”
The typically left-of-center publication adds, “Though very rare, complications from shots can shatter lives and trust. Now the federal programs designed to help them are struggling with COVID-19.”

National Geographic writes: Emily discovered that two U.S. programs exist to compensate people with severe side effects likely caused by immunizations. But only one of these programs covers COVID-19 vaccines, and so far, it hasn’t actually paid any claims. Some experts question whether it ever will. This ambiguity isn’t just a problem for those with injuries. When people don’t know if they’ll be compensated for legitimate vaccine injuries, or when those who do get them feel dismissed and abandoned, it erodes vaccine confidence.

The article begins with the plight of 14-yr-old Aiden’s family but also addresses stuntman Cody Robinson, who got multiple blood clots after receiving a COVID jab, and 44-yr-old Jessica McFadden, a fundraising officer in Indiana, who chose to get the Johnson & Johnson vaccine in early April because a single shot was more appealing than a two-dose vaccine. But one week after her jab, breathing became increasingly difficult. By late April, a coughing fit required her to lie down to breathe. A CT scan showed a pulmonary embolism, a blood clot wedged in a lung artery. More imaging revealed another clot headed straight to McFadden’s heart.

The cardiologist told her she needed emergency surgery, adding, “you have 12 hours to live,” McFadden recalls. “At that point I had to call my husband and give him a goodbye message.”

Doctors ultimately removed the clot near her heart, several from her lungs, another in her leg, and two from her brain. McFadden spent five days recovering in the ICU from a diagnosis of thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome, or TTS, an extremely rare adverse event that can occur after the J&J vaccine. TTS occurs in approximately four people per million doses, but its severity led the CDC to recommend mRNA vaccines over the J&J shot in December.

After losing several jobs worth more than $40,000 in wages, he felt “strong-armed” by his industry. “It became clear to me that the message in the industry was, if you don’t get vaccinated, you ain’t working,” he says.

Like McFadden, Robinson developed multiple blood clots after his J&J jab, including one in his jugular vein. Now, despite having encouraged his mom to get vaccinated, he feels disillusioned. Since he can’t do stunts while taking blood thinners, he’s losing more money now than before—and more than CICP’s wage cap of $50,000. “If the government’s going to force you to do something, they should provide compensation if they’re screwing you over,” he says.

Since COVID-19 vaccines were developed during a pandemic, they’re currently covered by the less robust CICP program, which has a lower budget than VICP and covers fewer expenses. Of more than 4,000 claims filed so far to CICP for COVID-19 vaccine injuries, the program has resolved five—all denied.

“We call the CICP program a black hole,” says Greg Rogers, a lawyer with Rogers Hofrichter & Karrah LLC in Atlanta who offered to help Emily Ekanayake file a claim pro bono. Nine months after Aiden’s vaccination, Emily still has no idea when—or if—she’ll receive any compensation for her son’s injury.

CNBC reports – If you experience severe side effects after getting a Covid vaccine, lawyers tell CNBC there is basically no one to blame in a U.S. court of law.

The federal government has granted companies like Pfizer and Moderna immunity from liability if something unintentionally goes wrong with their vaccines.

“It is very rare for a blanket immunity law to be passed,” said Rogge Dunn, a Dallas labor and employment attorney. “Pharmaceutical companies typically aren’t offered much liability protection under the law.“

You also can’t sue the Food and Drug Administration for authorizing a vaccine for emergency use, nor can you hold your employer accountable if they mandate inoculation as a condition of employment.

Congress created a fund specifically to help cover lost wages and out-of-pocket medical expenses for people who have been irreparably harmed by a “covered countermeasure,” such as a vaccine. But it is difficult to use and rarely pays. Attorneys say it has compensated less than 6% of the claims filed in the last decade.

The side effects of the COVID shots may be “rare,” but the individuals and families stuck paying the hospital bills don’t care how “rare” they are when they’re the ones writing the checks for the treatment to keep themselves or their loved ones alive.

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