Yesterday, Wall Street Journal reporter Rebecca Ballhaus tweeted an article she wrote about how the Acting Defense Secretary Pat Shanahan approved measures to keep the name of the USS John McCain hidden during President Trump’s visit to Japan. In her tweet, Ballhaus said that according to a “U.S. official,” the defense secretary went out of his way to keep it hidden so it didn’t interfere with his trip.

Ballhaus tweeted: NEW: The White House wanted the USS John McCain “out of sight” for Trump’s visit to Japan. A tarp was hung over the ship’s name ahead of the trip, and sailors—who wear caps bearing the ship’s name—were given the day off for Trump’s visit.

Next, she tweeted: Acting Defense Secretary Pat Shanahan was aware of the concern about the presence of the USS John McCain in Japan and approved measures to ensure it didn’t interfere w/Trump’s trip, a U.S. official said.

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Ballhaus then tweeted about how the Navy took care to make sure the USS John McCain wasn’t in President Trump’s line of vision during his visit to a Japanese helicopter carrier.

In another tweet, Ballhaus explains that the USS John McCain was officially named after the senator’s father and grandfather only a month before the anti-Trump senator’s death.

She then retweeted the response by John McCain’s daughter, Meghan McCain, who was responding to her article about President Trump, saying he is acting like a “child.”

Megan McCain retweeted Ballhaus’ article, saying: Trump is a child who will always be deeply threatened by the greatness of my dads incredible life. There is a lot of criticism of how much I speak about my dad, but nine months since he passed, Trump won’t let him RIP. So I have to stand up for him. It makes my grief unbearable.

Ballhaus added: John McCain’s daughter responds to story that the White House wanted the ship named for her father, grandfather and great-grandfather “out of sight” for Trump’s trip to Japan.

CNN’s Anderson Cooper was only too happy to cover the story. Ballhaus retweeted an image of Cooper covering his face in disgust over the report by Ballhaus.

The New York Times most virulently anti-Trump reporter, Maggie Haberman retweeted Ballhaus’ article, calling it an “excellent scoop.” Ballhaus retweeted her tweet, adding an alleged quote from “one Navy sailor”: “One Navy sailor said that McCain sailors wearing their ship’s patches were even turned away from the president’s address.”

The Navy Chief of Information (The Pentagon • navy.mil) clapped by at Ballhaus, and her accusation that the name of the USS John S. McCain was covered during President Trump’s visit:

The name of USS John S. McCain was not obscured during the POTUS visit to Yokosuka on Memorial Day. The Navy is proud of that ship, its crew, its namesake and its heritage.

When asked by the anti-Trump CNN if he had any knowledge of the USS McCain being covered, President Trump responded by saying he certainly wasn’t a fan of Senator McCain, but that he didn’t know anything about it. Although it was clearly not an admission that the ship was covered for the benefit of the president, the media twisted President Trump’s comments to make it appear as though it was.

When Trump hating Twitter users began to question him, showing images of the ship with the name covered, The Navy Chief Of Information responded, by clarifying: That photo is not from the day of the POTUS visit (Monday in Japan, Sunday in US), as the WSJ report itself mentions.

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Daily Wire reporter Ryan Saavedra pointed out that the author of the hit -piece in the Wall Street Journal about Trump and the U.S. Navy ship, Rebecca Ballhaus, is the same person who famously misquoted President Trump in March (See tweet below).

One Twitter user asked: Doesn’t it matter WHEN it was obscured?

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Another user replied: Sure it does. And why. The ship is being repaired. There was a paint barge in front of it and sandblasting being done. It’s now known this photo was taken during repairs last weekend. Now I’m no rocket scientist but I know about drop cloths and tarps and why they’re used.

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