Steve Bannon was recently convicted on two misdemeanor counts of Contempt of Congress for refusing to comply with a subpoena from the corrupt January 6th Committee.

Bannon’s defense was brave but likely to result in a conviction after he admitted to refusing to comply with the subpoenas, but said that he did so on advice from his attorneys.

Bannon attempted to invoke executive privilege in his refusal to comply with the subpoena.

Much like the committee did with Pete Navarro, they referred him to be criminally charged by the Department of Justice before his attorneys had a chance to negotiate with the committee.

While his conviction was nearly inevitable, it was based on precedent handed down by DC Circuit courts that the judge presiding over Bannon’s case admitted is likely flawed.

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The precedent could be thrown out in an appeal that Bannon’s legal team is already filing.

The Epoch Times Reports

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Despite abiding by that 61-year-old precedent, Nichols allowed Bannon’s attorneys on several occasions to oh-by-the-way refer to their planned defenses before he shut them down at specific junctures that are certain to be pinpointed in transcripts on appeal.

Nichols himself expressed doubt about the Licavoli ruling surviving on appeal. “I was bound by D.C. Circuit precedent that I’m not even sure is right,” he said on the trial’s next-to-last day when the jury’s only appearance was to be dismissed for the day.

Leaving the courthouse following his conviction, Bannon said,

“We may have lost this battle here today but we didn’t lose the war. I stand with President Trump and the Constitution and I always will.” Bannon said.

Schoen said he will file “a bulletproof appeal” that, among the “advice from attorney” component, will also focus on the interpretation of “willful” that jurors had to use while deliberating.

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