Serial liar and 2020 Democrat presidential hopeful Senator Elizabeth Warren just can’t help herself. In an effort to try to make herself relevant and in what seems like a desperate attempt to address her irrelevancy, Warren appears to have made up a sick story of sexual harassment at the hands of a law professor at Harvard University.

After her account about what happened with the now deceased Harvard law professor on Meet the Press, the Boston Herald called out the senator, who has a history of lying. In 1997, Elizabeth Warren was listed as the Harvard Law’s “first woman of color” in a law review piece on diversity and affirmative action.

Trending: NEWLY ELECTED Somali MUSLIM Congresswoman Mocks JESUS And MIKE PENCE

Elizabeth Warren pushed back hard on questions about a Harvard Crimson piece in 1996 that described her as Native American, saying she had no idea the school where she taught law was billing her that way and saying it never came up during her hiring a year earlier, which others have backed up.

But a 1997 Fordham Law Review piece described her as Harvard Law School’s “first woman of color,” based, according to the notes at the bottom of the story, on a “telephone interview with Michael Chmura, News Director, Harvard Law (Aug. 6, 1996).”–GP

The Boston Herald set the record straight about Warren’s “new” account of  events with the now deceased law professor:

U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren reportedly switched up her account of sexual harassment that she relayed this weekend in a televised #MeToo testimonial from an earlier “light-hearted” version….

But the Boston Globe reported last night that Warren recounted the same incident in a “more light-hearted manner” at a memorial service after the professor’s death in 1997 — an account the Globe noted was “inconsistent” with her story on Sunday.

“During the service after his death in 1997, Warren spoke fondly of law professor Eugene Smith and told the gathered mourners she was laughing as Smith chased her around his desk, according to a colleague’s memoir,” the Globe reported.

The author of the memoir, John Mixon, told the paper, “I may have been wrong saying she was laughing,” adding that he was writing about the service 15 years after the fact.

The paper also noted that Warren failed to mention on “Meet The Press” that Smith had polio.

The Globe said Warren told the broadsheet yesterday she shared the story at the memorial service as a statement about Smith’s authority.

“It was 20 years later, and he didn’t have power over me any more,” Warren told the newspaper, which noted she was by then a Harvard law professor.


Join The Conversation. Leave a Comment.