Yesterday, social media lit up with images and videos of the fire that engulfed the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris. Facebook user Damien Rieu, tweeted a LIVE Facebook video of the Notre Dame Cathedral burning that included comments and emojis that were being used by Facebook users to denote their feelings about the horrific fire. Sadly, several Facebook users indicated how they felt about the fire by clicking the “smiley” emoji. Their use of the smiley emoji caught the attention of Twitter users after seeing Rieu’s tweet.

The outspoken and brilliant conservative, Paul Joseph Watson retweeted the video and remarked:

A brief summary of who is responding to the tragic Notre Dame fire with ‘smiley faces’ on Facebook. Appalling.

Buzzfeed, the publication that was caught lying about the phony Steele Dossier, was caught again, in January lying about the Michael Cohen’ congressional testimony has also been debunked, this time by special counsel Robert Mueller’s office. Fox New’s Shannon Bream was first to break the bombshell story in a tweet:

“BuzzFeed’s description of specific statements to the Special Counsel’s Office, and characterization of documents and testimony obtained by this office, regarding Michael Cohen’s Congressional testimony are not accurate,” said Peter Carr, a spokesman for Mueller’s office.

Now, BuzzFeed is again being forced to eat crow, after they were caught lying in an article they published yesterday, about the very popular conservative commentator and Trump supporter, Paul Joseph Watson. Buzzfeed’s misleading article about Watson’s retweet of a Facebook live video showing the burning of the Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris, with commentary from viewers, was an apparent effort to paint him as an unreliable source of information and an Islamophobe. They couldn’t have been more wrong on both counts.

Watson responded by discrediting the validity of Buzzfeed writer, Jane Lytvynenko’s article. Here is a portion of that article:

Far-right influencers are pushing an old narrative about “smiley face” reactions.

The video purports to show positive reactions to a video of Notre Dame burning, implying that people with Arabic names are celebrating. This isn’t the first time far-right personalities pointed to Facebook emojis to try and stroke anger. This also happened as far back as 2017 during the London bridge attack. During the Notre Dame fire the laughing face emojis were clearly in the minority and it’s impossible to know why people chose a specific emoji, or for that matter the religion of people reacting to a Facebook video. It’s also difficult to verify the authenticity of the accounts. Bottom line: Facebook emojis on a video do not tell us anything about a group of people.

Here is how Paul Joseph Watson responded to her misleading report and tweet:

Today, Paul Joseph Watson released a video in response to the sequence of events leading up to the Buzzfeed fake news article. In the video, Watson uses facts to expose the intentional lies the Buzzfeed News writers told, as they attempted to smear him with their hit-piece report.

Watch:

Paul Joseph Watson is one of our favorite conservative commentators. He is brilliant, outspoken and usually 100% spot on with his commentary. It’s unfortunate that he’s the constant target of the left who obviously fears his message.

What do you think about the Buzzfeed article? Should Buzzfeed offer Watson a public apology for unfairly smearing him? Tell us what you think in the comment section below.


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